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October Schedule 2014

Discussion of programming on TCM.

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Bronxgirl48
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby Bronxgirl48 » October 12th, 2014, 2:09 am

What's up, Western Guy? LOL

I love Lloyd! Adore him in A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN. Underrated dramatic actor. Enjoyable as Michael Shayne, too.

Western Guy
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby Western Guy » October 12th, 2014, 2:52 pm

Great talkin' to ya, Christie.

Lloyd was a good actor and prince of a guy. I gotta get Moira to post that interview I did with him.

And speaking of which, another actor who seemed old forever: Lewis Stone.

kingrat
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby kingrat » October 13th, 2014, 7:26 pm

Khartoum was better than I remembered, definitely earning a spot on the top ten list for 1966. Exemplary cinematography by Edward Scaife, sometimes billed as Ted Scaife, best known to me for his great work on The Kremlin Letter. Scaife gives us sand and browns and a controlled palette in some scenes, but it always looks natural and rich, not the late 60s/70s "sepia sludge" that I hate so much.

Robert Ardrey's intelligent script portrays Gladstone, General Gordon, and the Mahdi as intelligent, complex, and at least partially sympathetic characters. The dialogue often seems "ripped from the headlines." Charismatic Islamic leader who thinks nothing of killing to achieve his goals. Prime minister with no imperialistic designs, despite the urging of his advisers, is willing to sacrifice lives to keep his country out of a larger war. A history lesson in 1966, up-to-the-minute news today. Ralph Richardson is the ideal Gladstone; Laurence Olivier, under layers of makeup, makes the Mahdi dangerous and human; and Charlton Heston, though not ideally cast, doesn't embarrass himself in scenes of intellectual combat with them. The underutilized Richard Johnson has a good part as Gladstone's spy on Gordon (he's excellent as Cassius in the 1960s Julius Caesar, and I can only wish he had played Brutus instead of Jason Robards). Michael Hordern has a small part, as do other fine character actors.

Basil Dearden directs capably; like several English directors of his era, his accompishment has been undervalued. Yakima Canutt leads the second unit in some fine battle scenes.

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moira finnie
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby moira finnie » October 14th, 2014, 11:25 am

I agree about Khartoum's qualities, but can't help thinking that some editing might have helped to make the story more accessible to modern audiences in the '60s and now.

Director Basil Dearden deserves to be more appreciated but this sweeping epic doesn't really seem to fit in with the rest of his work except that it reflects a nuanced intelligence behind the camera. Do you have a favorite film directed by Dearden (his filmography can be seen here)?

I know one member's answer is going to be The Captive Heart (1946)....you know who you are!
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norfious
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby norfious » October 14th, 2014, 12:30 pm

(From out of nowhere I appear again!)

I always love Octobers on TCM, since I love the old, hokey horror films. I have always wanted to see "The Tingler," and I am happy to see it being shown on Halloween this year! Unfortunately, I will be unable to watch it yet again. :\

I am very happy to see them showing 1963's "The Haunting," which I consider to be the best horror film I've ever seen. It's more of a psychological thriller than a horror film, really, but it is quite deep and it provokes so many questions! I own this one, but I will probably try to watch it on TCM to hear what Robert Osborne has to say about it.

RedRiver
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby RedRiver » October 14th, 2014, 12:57 pm

THE TINGLER is quite entertaining. I know several people who consider Robert Wise's disturbing THE HAUNTING our great horror film. I'll add you to the list!

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JackFavell
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby JackFavell » October 14th, 2014, 5:04 pm

Ooh, Loved the discussion of character actors who looked old from birth.... Moira, FANTASTIC photos. I've seen some of those at my secret photo source, but not all of them! I have a few other shockers I've collected over time if anyone wants to see them... some of those old coots were gorgeous! Young Harry Davenport I had seen before and just couldn't get over it.

I'm still looking for a Maude Eburne youth photo....but no such luck. She's an actress I've only just noticed...quite excellent at batty characters, like in Ruggles of Red Gap.

I believe I read that Lewis Stone went gray prematurely but it didn't stop him from being a leading man in the twenties.

And thanks for the salute to Laraine Day. Yes, I love her! I don't know exactly what makes her so appealing. I think perhaps she reminds me of my mother, a woman who was really lovely - beautiful, warm, graceful and elegant without ever in the least drawing attention to those attributes in herself. There's a whole lot to be said for being nice and unpretentious. Especially in Hollywood.

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moira finnie
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby moira finnie » October 14th, 2014, 6:03 pm

JackFavell wrote:I have a few other shockers I've collected over time if anyone wants to see them...

You have to ASK??? Of course I want to see your stash!! Please?

JackFavell wrote:I'm still looking for a Maude Eburne youth photo....but no such luck. She's an actress I've only just noticed...quite excellent at batty characters, like in Ruggles of Red Gap.

Maude Eburne's career was pretty extensive onstage, but she didn't make it to Broadway until after her 25th birthday, so finding images of her from plays that were early big hits for her, such as A Pair of Sixes (1914)--and the 1919 silent that resulted, is pretty tough. I did find an article by her in the October, 1919 Theatre Magazine entitled as below:

Women Who Are Funny Off the Stage by Maude Eburne

JackFavell wrote:I believe I read that Lewis Stone went gray prematurely but it didn't stop him from being a leading man in the twenties.

Lewis Stone was even a romantic lead in the teens. Guess who was the hunk who essayed the Joel McCrea/Louis Jourdan role in the original Broadway production of The Bird of Paradise in 1912? The famed Laurette Taylor was Mr. Stone's "Luana"...as usual the New York Times approached the show with disdain, but other papers and the public ate up the colorful scenery and their first tastes of Hawaiian music and dance on the stage of Daly's Theatre in NYC. It probably didn't hurt that the show opened in January, when most people would kill to see something green and warm in the Northeast.

JackFavell wrote:And thanks for the salute to Laraine Day. Yes, I love her! I don't know exactly what makes her so appealing. I think perhaps she reminds me of my mother, a woman who was really lovely - beautiful, warm, graceful and elegant without ever in the least drawing attention to those attributes in herself. There's a whole lot to be said for being nice and unpretentious. Especially in Hollywood.

Loved her, but I must say that the movie with Barry Nelson as A Yank on the Burma Road was hilariously far-fetched with Cabbie Barry Nelson showing the Chinese how to drive a truck down a 90 degree angle hill and live to tell the tale.

Were there good parts? You bet. Laraine Day's hair was never even mussed (even when driving the above-mentioned truck), nor did she realize she was attracted to Barry until her Axis hubby showed his true colors and boy, was she surprised. Keye Luke had a leading role and was easily the most intelligent person in the film. Lots of Asian actors got a chance to play someone other than a cruel Japanese soldier (though lots of others did play those parts).
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JackFavell
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby JackFavell » October 14th, 2014, 7:25 pm

Wow! You are making me almost glad I missed the Road to Burma movie. I've never been fond of Barry Nelson. I think I mentioned before that I saw him in a play in the late seventies or early eighties. I swear his hair made an entrance before he did. The sight of that....gulp....frightening hennaed mop atop his wrinkled aging face was horrifying. Ah well. Keye Luke can do no wrong in my book.

As for the Maude Eburne link, well, Moira, you and norfious have made my day! Between this and the Arnold Stang interviews over at the character actors thread, I am one happy film fan. Thanks! I haven't been this excited since I found the Joseph Calleia collection of photos on ebay. I suspect you are a treasure. :D

OK, here's my collection of character actors who always looked old:

Now when I first saw this, I swore it was Constance Collier but it turns out to be Edward Everett Horton in drag. I know this is just going to stir up more controversy about this beloved actor, so I'll also include a drawing I found of EEH as a young man:

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THIS is Constance Collier. I know, it's hard to believe:

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Edward Van Sloan (in honor of Halloween). Hubba hubba!

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Lucile Watson:

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Roland Young:

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Walter Connolly:

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Henry Travers, looking exactly the same, in a 1926 production of Pygmalion:

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A dapper Spencer Charters, looking somewhat younger, though not young:

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Ian Wolfe, at right, in a production of The Seagull. Also pictured, Lewis Leverett, Dorothy Sands, and E.J. Ballantine.

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I realized that there is a subset of our list called "WHEN THEY HAD HAIR":

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I am embarrassed to admit that I think Lee Tracy is an adorable cutie in this photo:

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norfious
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby norfious » October 14th, 2014, 9:35 pm

JackFavell wrote:
Roland Young:

Image


Wow, it's really neat to see all these actors when they were younger. I am especially happy to see this photo Roland Young. He's another favorite of mine.

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knitwit45
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby knitwit45 » October 14th, 2014, 11:15 pm

moira finnie wrote:I agree about Khartoum's qualities, but can't help thinking that some editing might have helped to make the story more accessible to modern audiences in the '60s and now.

Director Basil Dearden deserves to be more appreciated but this sweeping epic doesn't really seem to fit in with the rest of his work except that it reflects a nuanced intelligence behind the camera. Do you have a favorite film directed by Dearden (his filmography can be seen here)?

I know one member's answer is going to be The Captive Heart (1946)....you know who you are!



:oops: :oops: :oops:...but it is such a WONDERFUL movie....... :lol:
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
""Most people pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it." ~ Soren Kierkegaard

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Bronxgirl48
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby Bronxgirl48 » October 14th, 2014, 11:59 pm

Jackie, OMG Edward Van Sloan!!!!

What is your avatar? I lurv it!

Western Guy
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby Western Guy » October 15th, 2014, 2:30 pm

Forgive me, but I have to add one more to that "Were they ever really young" list:

The immortal George Zucco.

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norfious
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby norfious » October 15th, 2014, 2:48 pm

I have some to add to the list. How about Walter Brennan and E.E Clive?

kingrat
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Re: October Schedule 2014

Postby kingrat » October 15th, 2014, 2:55 pm

In addition to Khartoum, Basil Dearden films I've liked include Saraband for Dead Lovers, The League of Gentlemen, The Bells Go Down, and Victim, and the ambitious All Night Long is interesting, if to me not really successful. Many thanks to TCM for introducing me to all these films except Khartoum. I've never seen Sapphire, Woman of Straw, or The Captive Heart.

I've never heard of most of his films, but imdb has information about them. If films as obscure as Saraband for Dead Lovers (thanks for the recommendation, Moira) and The Bells Go Down turn out to be more than watchable, there may well be others somewhere in the vaults.


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