Noir Alley

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Hoganman1
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by Hoganman1 »

I guess I'll watch THUNDER ROAD simply because I like Mitchum. However, I agree Eddie is really stretching to show this film on Noir Alley. DON''T BOTHER TO KNOCK didn't really fit the genre either. Here's hoping Eddie will get back to seedy detectives, femme fatales and murder soon.
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ElCid
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by ElCid »

Hoganman1 wrote: January 8th, 2023, 12:16 pm I guess I'll watch THUNDER ROAD simply because I like Mitchum. However, I agree Eddie is really stretching to show this film on Noir Alley. DON''T BOTHER TO KNOCK didn't really fit the genre either. Here's hoping Eddie will get back to seedy detectives, femme fatales and murder soon.
I had seen Don't Bother to Knock before, but watched it again. Somewhat interesting, but not all that good to me. More impressed with Anne Bancroft than Monroe, but then never been a fan of Monroe anyway.

As for Thunder Road, looking forward to what Eddie has to say about it.
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by Thompson »

Thunder Road. If I see one undrunk drink in this one I will make sure to post it.

Don’t Bother to Knock — Widmark is really good in noirs. He always comes across to me as not speaking dialogue but thinking about what to say or what to do and then doing it, sort of off script, I’m sure it’s not but he makes it seem like it is, if that makes any sense.

There were scenes with Monroe where I thought she was great. I got the “thing” she has. However, the director and crew ruined her performance, well she ruined it, in the ending. It was so sappy.
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laffite
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by laffite »

I posted last night on this thread and the post is GONE.
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jamesjazzguitar
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by jamesjazzguitar »

laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:33 pm I posted last night on this thread and the post is GONE.
On the other thread you have a very good post about Don't Brother to Knock. Maybe you posted it there and not here?
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by laffite »

jamesjazzguitar wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:37 pm
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:33 pm I posted last night on this thread and the post is GONE.
On the other thread you have a very good post about Don't Brother to Knock. Maybe you posted it there and not here?
Thank you, James.

This is probably untoward in some way but I am going to repost it here. For some reason I cannot delete this same post on the other one. No one has quoted it, but whatever.

To wit:

I have a few comments about Don't Bother to Knock but before I do that I need to open the blinds and have a look. You never know, something strange might happen. Why maybe ... but no ... that never happens to me.

A nifty little story, I liked the way the two elements of the story dovetailed each other. Anne Bancroft in her debut, was very breezy and cool, though miffed. I love that look on her face and the growing disbelief of what she hearing when Jed was telling a story. Did you notice that oval shaped mouth while he was talking? She looked appropriately in disbelief. She looked like an emoticon.

Widmark was good having to show two sides. Very amusing to see him giving up the easy mark as he sees a cooky and fragile thing and who doesn't make sense. And the way he got through to her.

I have seen this twice before and I didn't realize that Nell was so off the deep end. But that look we got when she was looking in the mirror, preening with jewelry A glimpse of the real Marilyn? I wonder how many takes it took to accomplish that final scene. Marilyn was fantastic there. That depleted look on her face, the body language, the turning away from (Anne), the way she said "...somebody entirely else." the way she surrendered the razor, even the elegant way she took the policeman's hand to be led away.>weep<
/
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HoldenIsHere
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by HoldenIsHere »

laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:46 pm
I have seen this twice before and I didn't realize that Nell was so off the deep end. But that look we got when she was looking in the mirror, preening with jewelry A glimpse of the real Marilyn? I wonder how many takes it took to accomplish that final scene. Marilyn was fantastic there. That depleted look on her face, the body language, the turning away from (Anne), the way she said "...somebody entirely else." the way she surrendered the razor, even the elegant way she took the policeman's hand to be led away.>weep<
/
Since you mention Marilyn Monroe's final scene in DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK, I'm re-posting something I posted earlier in tis this thread:

Marilyn Monroe's performance in this movie is amazingly subtle. Her acting talent and instincts were not recognized by the movie industry during her lifetime.
According to Anne Bancroft, Marilyn Monroe disagreed with director Roy Baker and her drama coach Natasha Lytess on how to play the final scene in DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK and ignored their advice.

Here's what Anne Bancroft said about Marilyn Monroe's work in that scene:
"The talent inside that girl was unquestionable. She did it her way and this got right inside me, actually floored me emotionally.
It was a remarkable experience! Because it was one of those very rare times in Hollywood when I felt the give and take that can only happen when you are working with good actors . . . There was just this scene of one woman seeing another who was helpless and in pain. It was so real, I responded. I really reacted to her. She moved me so that tears came into my eyes. Believe me, such moments happened rarely, if ever again, in the early things I was doing out there.”


By 1957, Anne Bancroft became dissatisfied with the movie industry and returned to New York to study acting and focus on work in the theater. She didn't return to movies until 1962 when she appeared in THE MIRACLE WORKER, reprising the role she had played on Broadway.
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ElCid
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by ElCid »

HoldenIsHere wrote: January 8th, 2023, 4:51 pm
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:46 pm
I have seen this twice before and I didn't realize that Nell was so off the deep end. But that look we got when she was looking in the mirror, preening with jewelry A glimpse of the real Marilyn? I wonder how many takes it took to accomplish that final scene. Marilyn was fantastic there. That depleted look on her face, the body language, the turning away from (Anne), the way she said "...somebody entirely else." the way she surrendered the razor, even the elegant way she took the policeman's hand to be led away.>weep<
/
Since you mention Marilyn Monroe's final scene in DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK, I'm re-posting something I posted earlier in tis this thread:

Marilyn Monroe's performance in this movie is amazingly subtle. Her acting talent and instincts were not recognized by the movie industry during her lifetime.
According to Anne Bancroft, Marilyn Monroe disagreed with director Roy Baker and her drama coach Natasha Lytess on how to play the final scene in DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK and ignored their advice.

Here's what Anne Bancroft said about Marilyn Monroe's work in that scene:
"The talent inside that girl was unquestionable. She did it her way and this got right inside me, actually floored me emotionally.
It was a remarkable experience! Because it was one of those very rare times in Hollywood when I felt the give and take that can only happen when you are working with good actors . . . There was just this scene of one woman seeing another who was helpless and in pain. It was so real, I responded. I really reacted to her. She moved me so that tears came into my eyes. Believe me, such moments happened rarely, if ever again, in the early things I was doing out there.”


By 1957, Anne Bancroft became dissatisfied with the movie industry and returned to New York to study acting and focus on work in the theater. She didn't return to movies until 1962 when she appeared in THE MIRACLE WORKER, reprising the role she had played on Broadway.
Top
In 1957 Bancroft made The Girl in Black Stockings for Bel Air productions. An interesting little movie, but somewhat disjointed. Bancroft did OK, but not one of her best performances. Of course the script and direction may have had something to do with that.
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ElCid
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by ElCid »

I would recommend going to TCM section of the boards and click on Noir Alley. Hopefully Lomm can lock out the other one.
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by laffite »

HoldenIsHere wrote: January 8th, 2023, 4:51 pm
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:46 pm
I have seen this twice before and I didn't realize that Nell was so off the deep end. But that look we got when she was looking in the mirror, preening with jewelry A glimpse of the real Marilyn? I wonder how many takes it took to accomplish that final scene. Marilyn was fantastic there. That depleted look on her face, the body language, the turning away from (Anne), the way she said "...somebody entirely else." the way she surrendered the razor, even the elegant way she took the policeman's hand to be led away.>weep<
/
Since you mention Marilyn Monroe's final scene in DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK, I'm re-posting something I posted earlier in tis this thread:

Marilyn Monroe's performance in this movie is amazingly subtle. Her acting talent and instincts were not recognized by the movie industry during her lifetime.
According to Anne Bancroft, Marilyn Monroe disagreed with director Roy Baker and her drama coach Natasha Lytess on how to play the final scene in DON'T BOTHER TO KNOCK and ignored their advice.

Here's what Anne Bancroft said about Marilyn Monroe's work in that scene:
"The talent inside that girl was unquestionable. She did it her way and this got right inside me, actually floored me emotionally.
It was a remarkable experience! Because it was one of those very rare times in Hollywood when I felt the give and take that can only happen when you are working with good actors . . . There was just this scene of one woman seeing another who was helpless and in pain. It was so real, I responded. I really reacted to her. She moved me so that tears came into my eyes. Believe me, such moments happened rarely, if ever again, in the early things I was doing out there.”


By 1957, Anne Bancroft became dissatisfied with the movie industry and returned to New York to study acting and focus on work in the theater. She didn't return to movies until 1962 when she appeared in THE MIRACLE WORKER, reprising the role she had played on Broadway.
Top
Thank you. I remember now reading that. It wasn't directly in my mind when I wrote the post. I had the same reaction when I saw DBTK years ago. But your post certainly reads well after viewing the movie last night. That is mighty testimony from Anne. No one listened. Marilyn's good looks worked against her. The Industry could only see a sexpot good only in sex comedies.

I believe Marilyn had an acting coach with her with most or all of her movies. I know it drove Billy Wilder crazy.. Marilyn needed one (though I don't approve the practice) probably because she was intimidated by directors, and that she felt alone.

But I don't second guess her. All is good, Dear Marilyn. RIP.
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by jamesjazzguitar »

laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:46 pm
I believe Marilyn had an acting coach with her with most or all of her movies. I know it drove Billy Wilder crazy.. Marilyn needed one (though I don't approve the practice) probably because she was intimidated by directors, and that she felt alone.

But I don't second guess her. All is good, Dear Marilyn. RIP.
I guess you didn't see Eddie's comments after the film. He mentions her acting coach Natasha Lytess (he showed a photo of the two), and how that drove the director of Don't Bother to Knock Roy Backer crazy as well as legendary directors like Hawks, Huston, and Wilder.

My understanding from the Huston book was that they didn't have an issue with Marilyn having a coach, but that Lytess was on the set 24\7 and would often contradict any instructions from a director (instead of helping Marilyn understand how to play a scene as requested by the director). When they would attempt to throw Lytess of the set, Marilyn would have a fit causing more delays (after already showing up late!).
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by laffite »

jamesjazzguitar wrote: January 8th, 2023, 6:34 pm
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:46 pm
I believe Marilyn had an acting coach with her with most or all of her movies. I know it drove Billy Wilder crazy.. Marilyn needed one (though I don't approve the practice) probably because she was intimidated by directors, and that she felt alone.

But I don't second guess her. All is good, Dear Marilyn. RIP.
I guess you didn't see Eddie's comments after the film. He mentions her acting coach Natasha Lytess (he showed a photo of the two), and how that drove the director of Don't Bother to Knock Roy Backer crazy as well as legendary directors like Hawks, Huston, and Wilder.

My understanding from the Huston book was that they didn't have an issue with Marilyn having a coach, but that Lytess was on the set 24\7 and would often contradict any instructions from a director (instead of helping Marilyn understand how to play a scene as requested by the director). When they would attempt to throw Lytess of the set, Marilyn would have a fit causing more delays (after already showing up late!).
Yes, I remember that. He mentioned the particularities of the case with DBTK.

But as you point out this acting coach thing affected later directors later, I know for sure that it bothered Wilder(as well as all her indiscretions on the set), which is what I said. All her coaches were a PITA (as I have read).
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by jamesjazzguitar »

laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 6:48 pm
jamesjazzguitar wrote: January 8th, 2023, 6:34 pm
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 1:46 pm
I believe Marilyn had an acting coach with her with most or all of her movies. I know it drove Billy Wilder crazy.. Marilyn needed one (though I don't approve the practice) probably because she was intimidated by directors, and that she felt alone.

But I don't second guess her. All is good, Dear Marilyn. RIP.
I guess you didn't see Eddie's comments after the film. He mentions her acting coach Natasha Lytess (he showed a photo of the two), and how that drove the director of Don't Bother to Knock Roy Backer crazy as well as legendary directors like Hawks, Huston, and Wilder.

My understanding from the Huston book was that they didn't have an issue with Marilyn having a coach, but that Lytess was on the set 24\7 and would often contradict any instructions from a director (instead of helping Marilyn understand how to play a scene as requested by the director). When they would attempt to throw Lytess of the set, Marilyn would have a fit causing more delays (after already showing up late!).
Yes, I remember that. He mentioned the particularities of the case with DBTK.

But as you point out this acting coach thing affected later directors later, I know for sure that it bothered Wilder(as well as all her indiscretions on the set), which is what I said. All her coaches were a PITA (as I have read).
I agree with you about Wilder, and so does Eddie. He mentioned all 3 of those legendary directors. Thus what you said, is what Eddie said, and that was what I was pointing out. I.e. instead of you saying "I believe Marilyn,,,", you could have just said "Eddie confirmed that,,,,". (I hope you can agree that what Eddie believes \ says carries a little more weigh then what you or I or other at this forum have to say).
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by laffite »

jamesjazzguitar wrote: January 9th, 2023, 10:55 am
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 6:48 pm
jamesjazzguitar wrote: January 8th, 2023, 6:34 pm

I guess you didn't see Eddie's comments after the film. He mentions her acting coach Natasha Lytess (he showed a photo of the two), and how that drove the director of Don't Bother to Knock Roy Backer crazy as well as legendary directors like Hawks, Huston, and Wilder.

My understanding from the Huston book was that they didn't have an issue with Marilyn having a coach, but that Lytess was on the set 24\7 and would often contradict any instructions from a director (instead of helping Marilyn understand how to play a scene as requested by the director). When they would attempt to throw Lytess of the set, Marilyn would have a fit causing more delays (after already showing up late!).
Yes, I remember that. He mentioned the particularities of the case with DBTK.

But as you point out this acting coach thing affected later directors later, I know for sure that it bothered Wilder(as well as all her indiscretions on the set), which is what I said. All her coaches were a PITA (as I have read).
I agree with you about Wilder, and so does Eddie. He mentioned all 3 of those legendary directors. Thus what you said, is what Eddie said, and that was what I was pointing out. I.e. instead of you saying "I believe Marilyn,,,", you could have just said "Eddie confirmed that,,,,". (I hope you can agree that what Eddie believes \ says carries a little more weigh then what you or I or other at this forum have to say).
Oh, you think I was stealing Eddie's point. Well, I was referring to my own memories about what I read. Eddie fades in and out with me. Everybody knows about Marilyn's behavior anyway. It's general domain info. I surprised you would make a deal of this.
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Re: Noir Alley

Post by jamesjazzguitar »

laffite wrote: January 9th, 2023, 3:07 pm
jamesjazzguitar wrote: January 9th, 2023, 10:55 am
laffite wrote: January 8th, 2023, 6:48 pm

Yes, I remember that. He mentioned the particularities of the case with DBTK.

But as you point out this acting coach thing affected later directors later, I know for sure that it bothered Wilder(as well as all her indiscretions on the set), which is what I said. All her coaches were a PITA (as I have read).
I agree with you about Wilder, and so does Eddie. He mentioned all 3 of those legendary directors. Thus what you said, is what Eddie said, and that was what I was pointing out. I.e. instead of you saying "I believe Marilyn,,,", you could have just said "Eddie confirmed that,,,,". (I hope you can agree that what Eddie believes \ says carries a little more weigh then what you or I or other at this forum have to say).
Oh, you think I was stealing Eddie's point. Well, I was referring to my own memories about what I read. Eddie fades in and out with me. Everybody knows about Marilyn's behavior anyway. It's general domain info. I surprised you would make a deal of this.
Wow, we are really failing to communicate. Of course I know you were referring to your own memory. So my point all along is that you should have "stole" the comments Eddie made instead of depending on your memory of these points. Why speculate instead of just referencing Eddie's comments? Note that since I'm on the west coast I typically see Eddie's after-film comments for Noir Alley twice; Once late Saturday, and early Sunday morning (I miss the film since that is too early, but typically catch just the end of the film and his comments.
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