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What are you reading?

Films, TV shows, and books of the 'modern' era

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feaito

Re: What are you reading?

Postby feaito » August 26th, 2013, 4:46 pm

JackFavell wrote:Yes, it is definitely a saudade feeling in the book... I will definitely watch that series as soon as I am done reading the excellent novel. And then I will see if I can get a copy of that Haunted Screen movie book. I think you and I are closest as far as these films are concerned, they are my favorite sub-genre of classic film.

I can't wait for you to see Lang's Liliom, to hear what you have to say. It's very very different from the Borzage version.


I also feel the connection WEN. Portrait of Jennie is my number one favorite film of all time and Letter is among the top five as well...I have already seen Lang's version and revisited Borzage's film as well; I posted a couple of commentso my FB wall. I loved Lang's film 9/10. For me it has one of Boyer's finest performances ever.

kingrat wrote:Feaito, you might like Truly, Madly, Deeply. Give it a try. Anthony Minghella is a good director, Juliet Stevenson is quite good as the widow, and Alan Rickman is surprisingly attractive cast against type in a romantic role.

And what other film has the line, "I can't believe these dead people are in my living room watching videos"?


Thanks for the recommendation Kingrat. I'll look for it. Rickman is a great actor. I can't understand why the author included "Ghost" along with such treasures as Jennie, Letter, Wuthering Heights, Ghost and Mrs. Muir et al. It'd be like including and/or comparing "Pretty Woman" along/with "The Lady Eve".
Last edited by feaito on August 27th, 2013, 8:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

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JackFavell
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Re: What are you reading?

Postby JackFavell » August 26th, 2013, 6:37 pm

I will check out your wall, Fer, I am really excited to see what you said. Portrait of Jennie and Ghost and Mrs. Muir are two great favorites of mine, but I could pretty much say that I like every movie in this genre.

I think Boyer and Lang capture the feeling of the original play sooooo very well. The movie benefits from the humor injected toward the end, and not too much sentimentality in the more dramatic parts (I think it could actually use a bit more). It's my favorite Lang so far.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby kingrat » August 26th, 2013, 7:32 pm

Feaito, I agree about Ghost, which is simply not the same kind of film.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Professional Tourist » August 26th, 2013, 8:37 pm

feaito wrote:I did not read the two essays on the two contemporary films analysed: "Ghost" and "Truly, Madly, Deeply", because I did not see them and I'm not interested.

I can recommend the 1990 film Ghost highly, highly. I can't watch it without tearing up. This is a good movie for people who believe in true love and soul mates. But not recommended for anyone who has recently lost same -- the film was released shortly after my father passed away, and I implored my step mother not to see it. :( :cry:

I attempted to watch Truly, Madly, Deeply this weekend, but couldn't get past the beginning where the woman's apartment had a rodent infestation problem. Had to switch it off, creeped-out. :x

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Professional Tourist » August 26th, 2013, 8:43 pm

Masha wrote:It has been my unfortunate experience to find wonderful ideas buried in horrible narration. . . .

What an intriguing observation, Masha. 8) That might be similar to watching a bad musical play that ends up having one really good song. :)

You're kind of a groovy person, you know? 8) 8) :D :oops:

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby sandykaypax » August 27th, 2013, 12:52 pm

Masha, I've not read any books by Terry Pratchett, but he is one of my husband's favorite authors. The books are a blend of fantasy and humor. I say, give them a try.

Sandy K

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby kingrat » August 28th, 2013, 6:50 pm

ChiO, thank you for recommending Brian Kellow's biography of Pauline Kael, A LIFE IN THE DARK. Kellow writes gracefully, with a clear look at her strengths, her accomplishments, and her shortcomings, with no attempt at hero worship or vilification. Unfortunately, Kael's daughter Gina declined to participate, but Kellow interviewed many people who came into contact with Pauline.

I was fascinated by the first hundred pages, learning about her childhood in a community of Jewish chicken ranchers in Petaluma, California (sounds like a Woody Allen punch line, but isn't). After attending Berekely, she knew literary figures like the poets Robert Duncan and Weldon Kees. In fact, Kees' apparent suicide led to her taking over his show on public radio. The man she moved to New York with not only turned out to be bisexual, but went to live with the composers Samuel Barber and Gian Carlo Menotti. I love these unexpected connections. Kael wrote plays, and I wish Kellow had dealt more with her creative writing. Eventually she married a man who ran a repertory movie house, she began writing program notes, and her movie reviewing career took off.

As far as I'm concerned, her pre-New Yorker work is the liveliest and most permanently interesting criticism she did. The lack of space limitations in The New Yorker led to sprawling, unfocused pieces, and because she is very much an impressionist critic, if I don't share her impressions, her later reviews aren't too helpful to me. Kellow recounts her need for money, her desire to get rid of the New Yorker's other critic, Penelope Gilliatt, here portrayed as a hopeless lush; Gilliatt doesn't emerge favorably from William Mann's biography of John Schlesinger, either. I'd like to have heard more about Kael's time in Hollywood, but Kellow seems to give fair presentations of Kael's love of and dependence on her daughter (Kael didn't type or drive) and of the followers who were dubbed "Paulettes." He also goes into some detail about her least creditable acts, the appropriation without acknowledgment of Howard Suber's research on Citizen Kane.

I can't quite agree with ChiO that Pauline was secretly an auteurist. Yes, she played favorites with directors, and it's amusing to read Andrew Sarris' complaints about this: Pot, meet Kettle. Sam Peckinpah was one of her favorites, but she called Straw Dogs a fascist work of art and called The Getaway "self-parasitism." Examples of such tough love, if you want to call it that, are all but nonexistent among the Sarris-influenced auteurists.

Pauline Kael made movies and moviegoing seem important and exciting, and despite disagreements about films, directors, or general approaches to cinema, I miss her lively intelligence and quick wit.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby RedRiver » August 30th, 2013, 5:20 pm

I like both those Peckinpah films.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby Professional Tourist » September 5th, 2013, 2:26 pm

I finished Paul Henreid's autobiography, "Ladies' Man," this week. It was wonderful. I could hear his voice in each sentence. Every page held my attention, it was never dull at all. What an interesting life and nice guy. I would have liked if the book had been longer and more detailed -- sometimes I'd notice that he'd skip over a few years, and I'd feel disappointed. :D I didn't always agree with the choices he made or the approaches he took in certain situations, but we all make mistakes and hindsight is 20/20, as they say. Highly recommended book, an easy breezy read, good for bedtime. 8) 8)

feaito

Re: What are you reading?

Postby feaito » September 5th, 2013, 4:43 pm

I'll keep in mind your recommendation PT.

I read Eben Alexander's "Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon's Journey into the Afterlife", a short book on his experiences after being in coma for seven days or so, which very much reflect what I've always believed about the so-called "afterlife". A book which uplifts one's spirits.

Yesterday I began "Queen Anne - The Politics of Passion" by Anne Somerset, which so far has been a very engrossing read.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby RedRiver » September 6th, 2013, 3:04 pm

I'm thinking of doing some E-reading this weekend. Nothing in particular. Just to see if I like it!

feaito

Re: What are you reading?

Postby feaito » September 7th, 2013, 9:39 pm

Thanks Masha for sharing those personal experiences of your fiancé and you. I have never had any such experiences and I am always willing to read about other people's views of this subject and experiences of this kind. In 2011 I underwent a long duodenopancreatectomy that lasted around 6 hours and I was in intensive care for 4 days, but I did not experience anything like it.

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Re: What are you reading?

Postby CineMaven » September 9th, 2013, 9:12 am

I've not had any near death experiences in my reading. But I have had the experience of reading a book that made me laugh my silly head off...

Image Image

...and enjoyed the poignancy of love and life. I just finished George Burns' book, and am now in the process of reading about Helen Hayes. I'm still at the beginning of the beginning of Miss Hayes' life. Interesting.
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