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PBS

Films, TV shows, and books of the 'modern' era

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movieman1957
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Re: PBS

Postby movieman1957 » April 29th, 2014, 9:51 am

I know Australians are a little more "out there" so I'll be on the lookout.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

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knitwit45
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Re: PBS

Postby knitwit45 » April 29th, 2014, 10:00 am

Everything is handled quite tastefully, no need to cover your eyes...
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
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movieman1957
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Re: PBS

Postby movieman1957 » April 29th, 2014, 10:59 am

Darn.
Chris

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knitwit45
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Re: PBS

Postby knitwit45 » April 29th, 2014, 12:15 pm

:shock: :shock: :shock: :shock:
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
""Most people pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it." ~ Soren Kierkegaard

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knitwit45
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Re: PBS

Postby knitwit45 » April 29th, 2014, 4:06 pm

Big mistake!!! It's Kerry Greenwood, not Underwood!! ( I also edited my original post.)
"Life is not the way it's supposed to be.. It's the way it is..
The way we cope with it, is what makes the difference." ~ Virginia Satir
""Most people pursue pleasure with such breathless haste that they hurry past it." ~ Soren Kierkegaard

kingrat
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Re: PBS

Postby kingrat » July 8th, 2014, 11:38 am

PBS is running some longer, movie-length Poirot episodes. These seem to have been made in the last few years. Three-Act Tragedy was very good, wonderfully directed, and The Clocks was also first-rate. The Clocks was moved back from the late 1950s to the late 1930s so that the underground tunnels in Dover Castle could be used for the spy plot. This might actually have improved Dame Agatha's story.

Production values were again high, right up there with the acting, and the shots of Dover Castle and the famous White Cliffs were an added treat.

If you enjoy Agatha and Poirot, keep an eye out for these. 100 minutes works much better than 60 minutes for dramatizing a full-length Christie novel.

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Re: PBS

Postby RedRiver » July 8th, 2014, 12:06 pm

I just read two Poirot books. ELEPHANTS CAN REMEMBER and FIVE LITTLE PIGS. Sometimes I like to get back to the basics!

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movieman1957
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Re: PBS

Postby movieman1957 » September 15th, 2014, 1:36 pm

Ken Burns's "The Roosevelts, An Intimate Portrait" began last night and dealt largely with Theodore's childhood, young life and, by the end of the part, his rise to the presidency.

What a complex and interesting man. The things he overcame and took on through his early life are quite astonishing. The most surprising thing I learned, and frankly would have been one of the easiest to discover, was his wife and mother died on the same day. The context and aftermath of a most tragic day as presented by Burns and company packs quite the emotional impact. This was not to be the only tragedies in his life.

Powerful, driven, funny, daring and conceited, among other traits, all make Theodore a fascinating subject and especially when presented in this fashion.

This whole project is scheduled for 14 hours.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

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moira finnie
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Re: PBS

Postby moira finnie » September 15th, 2014, 5:41 pm

I am recording The Roosevelts since real life prevents me from watching consistently this week. I am so fascinated by all three figures, and especially how they affected each other's innovative approach to life. Can't wait. May have to binge watch when I can.
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Re: PBS

Postby RedRiver » September 16th, 2014, 8:56 pm

I wish we could Tivo real life!

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Re: PBS

Postby mrsl » September 18th, 2014, 6:06 pm

.The Roosevelts is quite riveting. I hope some of you saw the preview programs PBS aired 2 weeks ago as an introduction to what was coming in the Burns movie. It helped a bit to have a little early knowledge.

Kingrat, did you see the special documentary of "Becoming Poirot" which showed how David Suchet studied Ms. Christie's books to try to capture her ideas and thoughts on Poirot, and also how he goes through the makeup each day for filming, and practicing that mincing walk.

Phryne Fisher
took me about three episodes to come to like her. She was just a little too over the top for me, but I'm warming up to her.

I kind of like Mr. and Mrs. Murder as well. I've always liked Death in Paradise, but this new lead guy makes me really like it a lot. The other fellow was so cold, it was hard to warm up to him, but this new fellow . . . the minute he walked out into the ocean with his clothes on made me a fan.

However nothing can top all the great detectives on PBS, like Foley, Banks, and Morse.

I like Breathless but it barely holds a candle to Call the Midwife. I miss that one a lot.
Anne


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* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

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mrsl
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Re: PBS

Postby mrsl » September 24th, 2014, 11:03 am

.
Well, I finished watching the Roosevelts and was impressed with the detail taken to be correct except for the minor references to Daisy Suckley, fifth cousin to FDR. If anyone saw Hyde Park on Hudson, you know there was a lot more to their relationship than was inferred in the Burns movie. Apparently FDR liked his ladies but rather than choosing strangers, he picked from his very large family of cousins but the movie I mentioned was strictly about Daisy and FDRs intimate relationship. I don't know if Mr. Burns was trying not to tarnish FDRs shining memory or what but now it is well known that the man had many clos lady friends. I wonder if anyone else noticed in the photos of FDR and his mother together, how he actually had her face. With a wig on him, they could have passed as twins. I found myself feeling sad for Eleanor because besides being quite unattractive, she had to fight an uphill battle most of her life in trying to make FDR a husband instead of his mothers' son.
Anne


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* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

]***********************************************************************

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Rita Hayworth
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Re: PBS

Postby Rita Hayworth » September 24th, 2014, 2:15 pm

I loved the Roosevelt's ... it's one of the better programming on PBS these days ...

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Lucky Vassall
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Re: PBS

Postby Lucky Vassall » September 24th, 2014, 3:22 pm

Ken Burns has never disappointed. This was true right from his "Civil War" masterpiece.

I missed Prohibition (by a couple of years), and his documentary explained a lot I had always been puzzled about.

I believe the Japanese have a way to honor master craftsmen. We should have a similar method to acknowledge his contribution to desperately-needed continuing education for Americans in their own history.
AVATAR: Billy DeWolfe as Mrs. Murgatroid, “Blue Skies” (1946)

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“You’re lucky. Now they have immigration laws."

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:–)—
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Re: PBS

Postby moira finnie » September 25th, 2014, 9:34 am

Lucky Vassall wrote:Ken Burns has never disappointed. This was true right from his "Civil War" masterpiece.

I missed Prohibition (by a couple of years), and his documentary explained a lot I had always been puzzled about.

I believe the Japanese have a way to honor master craftsmen. We should have a similar method to acknowledge his contribution to desperately-needed continuing education for Americans in their own history.

The idea of selecting individuals as "Living National Treasures" as the Japanese do might be comparable to the Kennedy Center Honorees, I suppose. Ken Burns (and his less visible partner, Geoffrey Ward, who contributed greatly to The Roosevelts on-camera and off) ought to be among them. Hope to live to see that happen!

Lucky--have you seen Burns' The Dust Bowl (2012)? We discussed it here: viewtopic.php?f=17&t=6033&hilit=dustbowl
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