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Behind Locked Doors (1948)

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RedRiver
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Re: Behind Locked Doors (1948)

Postby RedRiver » March 11th, 2014, 12:48 pm

The conditions of my parole prohibit me from talking about my very favorite fantasy (and one of my favorite movies, period). I'll have to skip the first class! Were I allowed to discuss it, I would say it shows what wonders can be executed with practically no budget at all.

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ChiO
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Re: Behind Locked Doors (1948)

Postby ChiO » March 11th, 2014, 5:41 pm

my very favorite fantasy

Fantasy? It's not fantasy...it's Paranoia! Atomic fallout, loss of control over the environment, the shrinking role of the male in the domestic relationship, and the ever-diminishing role of Man in the Universe (until one becomes One with the Universe).

I'll admit it -- I thought of you when I programmed it.
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

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moira finnie
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Re: Behind Locked Doors (1948)

Postby moira finnie » March 11th, 2014, 6:16 pm

ChiO wrote:
I Married a Monster from Outer Space (no, Moira, it is not about an irrational fear of torpedo bras)

It should be! Just the thought of that painful looking gear makes me run.

Hey, ChiO. Com'on, man. It's the 21st century. When are you going to start video recording or podcasting this class. You couldn't get me to move to Chicago (or NYC), but if I could just hear the discussions and esp. your intros and comments.

Huh? Whaddya mean, that's not in the budget?
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RedRiver
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Re: Behind Locked Doors (1948)

Postby RedRiver » March 12th, 2014, 12:56 pm

the shrinking role of the male in the domestic relationship

I honestly never thought of that, Chio. Your class must be a doozy!

Brian McFadden
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Re: Behind Locked Doors (1948)

Postby Brian McFadden » March 14th, 2014, 8:25 pm

Brian, from what I understand based on Moore's book, Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star and interviews, he not only grew (understandably) resentful of the "Dickie" diminutive, but he was pretty fed up with acting in general by the time he appeared in Sergeant York (1941) as a teen. I am curious if his mute role in Out of the Past (1947) led to this peculiar and also silent part in Behind Locked Doors?

Thank you so much, Moira, for reminding me of the name of Dick Moore's book. I just went hunting for it and found the copy he autographed for me 30 years ago! I was reminded that there was a seriousness and a sadness about him all those years ago. And a large part of him still wanted to know what life would have been like had he not been pushed into the business. He also wanted to know how other child stars felt, so he set about interviewing them for the book. I've just begun re-reading "Twinkle, Twinkle" and it's every bit as good as I remembered. Recommended!

Brian

Brian McFadden
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Re: Behind Locked Doors (1948)

Postby Brian McFadden » March 14th, 2014, 8:47 pm

ChiO wrote:STRANGERS IN THE NIGHT is definitely an important introduction of the Mann to come and one that should be seen. I reviewed it here. And I certainly agree that THE MADONNA'S SECRET is another John Alton wonder. An atmospheric gem oddly reminiscient of Edgar Ulmer's BLUEBEARD. It is Exhibit A that a great film need not be dependent on script or acting...that set design and a genius behind the camera can provide all one needs to to be glued to the screen. Plus some love from Mommy.


I really enjoyed your review of Strangers in the Night and your comments about Mann. I keep hoping that the other early Republic films, like Mann's Strange Impersonation will get more TV exposure. The Great Flamarion is readily available, but only because it's in the public domain.

Brian


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