The most important thing is to enjoy your life - to be happy - it's all that matters.
- Audrey Hepburn

Kevin Brownlow's Hollywood (1980)

Moderators: Sue Sue Applegate, movieman1957, moira finnie, Lzcutter

User avatar
Ann Harding
Posts: 1271
Joined: January 11th, 2008, 11:03 am
Location: Paris
Contact:

Postby Ann Harding » December 15th, 2008, 8:33 am

If you are -like me- fascinated by Kevin Brownlow's wonderful documentary, you should read the 4th part of the interview I did on the subject:
Image

http://www.dvdclassik.com/Critiques/interview-kevin-brownlow-part-4.htm

If you want the text in English, click Here

Don't forget the sound bites which contain a host of wonderful anecdotes, often hilarious! :D

User avatar
MichiganJ
Posts: 1406
Joined: May 20th, 2008, 4:37 pm
Contact:

Postby MichiganJ » December 15th, 2008, 12:07 pm

Christine,

Bravo on this stellar interview. Your questions are terrific, and allow Mr. Brownlow to weave his extraordinary stories in a way that brings out not only his passion for the films, but reveal his sense of humor as well. This installment in particular, on Hollywood, is simply amazing. Too bad there’s not a documentary on the making of this documentary! (If it ever comes out on DVD, I sure hope Mr. Brownlow does a commentary track!).

I particularly like the credit he gives to Producer David Gill, especially in regards to The Kid and the interview with Jackie Coogan (you are right, that is an emotional highlight in the documentary.) And his stories about Swanson are a hoot!. I didn’t realize that Bessie Love acted as a consultant on the documentary, and it is great to learn that she was instrumental in getting the interview with Louise Brooks. (How can you not love the fact that Brooks’ scolded Brownlow for not including Clara Bow in The Parade’s Gone By?)

I’m loving each installment of this interview, and can’t thank you enough for sharing! :D
"Let's be independent together." Dr. Hermey DDS

User avatar
Ann Harding
Posts: 1271
Joined: January 11th, 2008, 11:03 am
Location: Paris
Contact:

Postby Ann Harding » December 16th, 2008, 4:40 am

Hi MichiganJ! I am so happy you enjoyed it so much! :D I remember that I couldn't stop laughing when I recorded that part. :lol:
I am so sad this terrific documentary is not on DVD.... :cry: I have no idea if it will ever be one day. As for a commentary track, well, I think Brownlow loathes this kind of thing, so I doubt he will ever do it. :wink:

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Postby charliechaplinfan » December 16th, 2008, 3:32 pm

Christine, this is marvellous. I have so enjoyed reading it. It doesn't surprise me what he says about Gloria Swanson.

I highly recommend Karl Brown's book, thank heavens Kevin found him because the book is great. A pity that his other work neve rmade it to publication, he is a very good writer.

As for Paul Ivano and the Valentino's Emily Leider's book describes their living arrangements. The Valentino's friendship with Ivano has fuelled the rumour mill that all was not well in that marriage, although Ivano's testimony proves that it was a consummated relationship. I love the fact that Ivano saw Valentino whilst Kevin was interviewing him :lol:
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

drednm

Postby drednm » December 16th, 2008, 10:48 pm

Well none of these links work for me, but I already know what Brownlow has to say about Swanson since we've been corresponding for a while.

No matter. Gloria Swanson is still the greatest star of them all..... just watched FINE MANNERS again tonight and she is amazing. The print is not as good as the one I saw at Eastman House but good enough.

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Postby charliechaplinfan » December 17th, 2008, 1:59 pm

I'd say the greatest star was Mary Pickford. I'm really enjoying Kevin's book Mary Pickford Rediscovered. I love the introduction when Kevin tells of his meeting with Mary, it really brings her to life for me.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

drednm

Postby drednm » December 17th, 2008, 8:56 pm

Reading the Chaplin autobiography now and ordered Brownlow's Pickford book....

and..... I'm off from work til Jan 5!!!! I plan to catch up on a lot of silents I've had forever.....

drednm

Postby drednm » December 17th, 2008, 9:02 pm

I got LA BOHEME and CARMEN today.... I've seen the Gish/Gilbert film before but it was years ago... never seen Geraldine Farrar so that one should be interesting.

Might try one of the Marion Davies films I recently got but the copies are lousy.... still, probably the only chance to see LIGHTS OF OLD BROADWAY and BEVERLY OF GRAUSTARK.

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Postby charliechaplinfan » December 18th, 2008, 3:02 pm

You'll love the Mary Pickford book :wink:
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

drednm

Postby drednm » December 18th, 2008, 3:28 pm

Yes thanks I know I will......

wow just got A MORMON MAID in the mail..... Mae Murray (!)

User avatar
Gagman 66
Posts: 614
Joined: April 19th, 2007, 11:34 pm
Location: Nebraska

Postby Gagman 66 » December 18th, 2008, 8:31 pm

Christine,

:D I can finally hear the sound bites they are highly entertaining. Thank you so much. Wonderful work all around. Is Kevin still re-mastering HOLLYWOOD for a potential DVD release? Or at least a new broadcast master to be run on TCM?

Ed,

:o Hey, I've had LA BOHEME all along! You could have gotten that from me. I'm sure I have mentioned it numerous times in the past. Again the film needs allot of work. The transfer TCM runs is very soft, and the titles just zip on by on several occassions. The projection speed is much to fast. ANNIE LAURIE is actually in much better shape!

The Mae Murray title sounds interesting.

feaito

Postby feaito » December 18th, 2008, 9:45 pm

The 4th part is super interesting and very enlightening Christine. I was wondering why I hadn't received a notification message from the original thread in which you were posting your weekly installments :wink:

User avatar
Ann Harding
Posts: 1271
Joined: January 11th, 2008, 11:03 am
Location: Paris
Contact:

Postby Ann Harding » December 19th, 2008, 4:31 am

Hello Jeffrey! Unfortunately the Hollywood series doesn't belong to Photoplay or to Kevin Brownlow. :( It's the sole property of Fremantle (who possess the Thames TV catalogue). They haven't managed to clear the rights for all the film clips. So it's still in limbo.....I have no idea if it will ever be on DVD one day. :cry:

I have already a very nice print of La Bohème. It's a lovely Vidor though I find John Gilbert completely OTT and out-of-synch with Lillian Gish.

Thanks Fernando! It was an absolute pleasure to listen and record Brownlow's stories about Hollywood. :D

User avatar
silentscreen
Posts: 715
Joined: March 9th, 2008, 3:47 pm

Postby silentscreen » December 21st, 2008, 5:35 pm

Ann Harding wrote:
I have already a very nice print of La Bohème. It's a lovely Vidor though I find John Gilbert completely OTT and out-of-synch with Lillian Gish.

Thanks Fernando! It was an absolute pleasure to listen and record Brownlow's stories about Hollywood. :D


I agree Christine, John was completely OTT in that film. I think he was concentrating on other things than his acting and it shows.

Mr. Brownlow has done so much for film preservation and film production, not to mention his fine books. Had he done "Hollywood" and "Cinema Europe" alone, it would have been a life time achievement. Thanks so much for sharing this with us! :D

Brenda
"Humor is nothing less than a sense of the fitness of things." Carole Lombard

User avatar
Synnove
Posts: 334
Joined: March 8th, 2008, 10:00 am
Location: Sweden

Postby Synnove » December 22nd, 2008, 3:56 pm

I love both Hollyowwd and Cinema Europe. The Parade's Gone By is an essential book for silent film fans. I almost prefer the documentaries though, because you get to see and hear the stars, directors, cameramen and stuntmen tell their own stories, and you get a sense of the way film developed through the numerous clips. It's very fitting to tell the story of film through film.

Christine, I've read some of your interview, and I'm going to print the rest of it out and read it. You've really asked the right questions, it's a wonderful interview. Thanks for sharing it. :D


Return to “Silents & PreCodes”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests