This week on Turner

Discussion of programming on TCM.

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bobhopefan1940
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This week on Turner

Post by bobhopefan1940 »

April 29th through May 5th -

I'm not finding much to watch this week on TCM, but my tastes are kind of limited :wink: So I thought maybe some of you could tell me what you are looking forward to watching this week... And perhaps the weeks after that. I love to try new movies and perhaps if you could suggest what you are looking forward to seeing and why you are looking forward to seeing it, I might tune in too.
"How strange when an illusion dies. It's as though you've lost a child." --Judy Garland
"To help a friend in need is easy, but to give him your time is not always opportune." --Charlie Chaplin
"Dumb show is best for screen people, if they must appear in public." --Buster Keaton
Mr. Arkadin
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Post by Mr. Arkadin »

There is a lot of great stuff on tomorrow:

He Ran All the Way (1951)

John Garfield's last film and one of his best. Nick Robey is a small time crook who holds a family hostage in their apartment. Garfield really runs the gamut of emotions here. If you're not a fan or haven't seen much of his work, this is a great place to get your feet wet.

The Big Heat (1953)

Glenn Ford and Gloria Grahame star in this classic crime film about a detective's battle with the mob. Grahame plays her typical bad girl role, but where many of her characters were downtrodden, "Debbie" has real wit and bite to her. Not a gal to mess with.

Lonely are the Brave (1962)

This is a great western about a man whose spirit is unwilling to bend to modern times. Kirk Douglas has claimed this as his favorite role and it's easy to see why. Jack Burns is a Don Quixote for our times championing man's indviduality and abilty above conformity and mechanization.

Others you might check out:

The Strange Woman (1946)

Dewey reccomends this film and it stars George Sanders--good enough for me!

The Hairy Ape (1944)

Never seen this, but it stars Willam Bendix (another great actor) and looks interesting. Will record and check out.

Finally, if you are into Brando (or even if you're not) you might find the documentary full of insights to some of his best work. Also, be sure to check out Streetcar Named Desire (1951). This landmark film broke a lot of the censor barriers and is definitely one of his best films. It also has amazing camerawork and lighting, and looks more like a Noir than the stage play it was based on.

Have fun tomorrow. You should be able to record enough to last you the rest of the week! :mrgreen:
JulieMarch4th
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Post by JulieMarch4th »

Danny,

I'm looking forward to 5/3 -- there's a whole slew of Mary Astor movies in celebration of her birthday, including one with Joan Blondell and Melvyn Douglas (There's Always A Woman) that I've never seen.

You probably already know about all the Bing movies on 5/2!

Julie
Mr. Arkadin
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Post by Mr. Arkadin »

Man on Fire (1957) is a great one! I have been waiting for it to come back on.
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mrsl
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Post by mrsl »

Hi Bob Hope Fan:

You said your tastes are limited but you didn't say to what they are limited. So I'm going to throw a few out that are some of my favorites that are all playing this coming week.

I think you know how I feel about Mr. Brando, so I'll ignore Mondays this month altogether but starting on Tuesday, there is Angels in the Outfield, if you've never seen this original with Janet Leigh and crotechety Paul Douglas, it's a 'must see'.

Thursday, if you want to set your timer for the conversation with Gregory Peck, it's definitely worth watching to see the character of the man, and why so many people appreciated his job as Atticus. Truthfully, he seems to have all the same values and beliefs.

If you like the 'conversations with RO, thursday afternoon is loaded with them, June Allyson, Lauren Bacall, and Debbie Reynolds. starting at 4 (3:00 Central).

Saturday, after the Producers, the rest of the evening is chock full of good drama, Not As a Stranger (Mitchum, and deHavilland), 12 Angry Men (Fonda, and 11 others) in a great courtroom, jury room film, and finally the Slender Thread, another fine example of Anne Bancroft and Sidney Poitiers' acting skills.

Finally early Sunday morning at 6:30 a.m. (5:30 Central) is the Magnificent Ambersons, which I believe is 10 times better than Citizen Kane.

Hope, whatever you choose, you will enjoy!

Anne
Hollis
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Post by Hollis »

Believe it or not, Ive never seen A Streetcar Named Desire so I'm looking forward to that (Tuesday at 12:30am est) and then there's not a lot that piques my interest until Saturday afternoon at 2:15 est when The Westerner airs and finally The Producers is on at 8 that evening. It does seem like an awfully slow week on TCM. I haven't found a lot to watch on IFC or FMC lately either. Boy do I hate watching commercial TV!
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bobhopefan1940
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Post by bobhopefan1940 »

I'm enjoying all these kindly replies, but with all these films being thrown out - Well, looks like I will have to pick and choose ;) I haven't seen A Street Car Named Desire either, as a matter of fact. I guess I should really check that one out. mrsl, what do you think of The Wild One? I know you are a Brando fan of course, but was curious how that one stacks up to the others. I'm curious about it, since I have heard so much about the film. I'm really planning on checking out Angels In the Outfield... I know my age is showing, but I really loved the Disney remake :oops:

I've seen part of Not As A Stranger, and liked what I saw. I'll probably record it this time around. I'm (unfortunately) very familiar with all the films TCM is airing of Bing Crosby later this week, I wish they had thrown some pre-codes in. Man On Fire is a wonderful example of his later work, his best acting perhaps.

I'm not very familiar with Mary Astor... So I guess this week will give me a chance to catch up on her work. I think I will also check out He Ran All The Way, since it comes so highly recommended.

Wow :D Looks like I'm set for the week! 8)
"How strange when an illusion dies. It's as though you've lost a child." --Judy Garland
"To help a friend in need is easy, but to give him your time is not always opportune." --Charlie Chaplin
"Dumb show is best for screen people, if they must appear in public." --Buster Keaton
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mrsl
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Post by mrsl »

Hi Bob Hope Fan:

Thank you for the laugh. I was trying to prevent bringing my dark feelings over from TCM by referring to marble mouth as Mr. Brando, but the truth is, I can't stand him!!!!

I've seen 'On the Waterfront', Sayonara, and Teahouse of the August Moon', and I think that's a prettty rounded example of his work. I saw bits and pieces of 'Streetcar' also. From what I've seen of him and his work, my opinion has been made, and I've never shied from it. I will definitely avoid TCM whenever his movies are on - Oh I just remembered, I saw what I think was named 'The Trial', something about a court martial on a guy for being a traitor, I believe. I can't understand a word the man speaks, don't think he's attractive, and find no 'charm' in his smile, besides thinking his 'method acting' is more than highly over-rated. I'm done, now.

Anyway, those who like John Wayne, if you have the Western channel on Encore, might want to check it out. They are also celebrating his 100'th birthday with many of his films both old and new. Personally, I hope they play some of his Mesquiteers movies, I always get a kick out of them.

Anne
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Dewey1960
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the HAIRY APE

Post by Dewey1960 »

Hello Mr. Ark -
Re: THE HAIRY APE
I tuned in for a few moments just to see if they were airing that ratty Public Domain print and, yes, they were. And that's a shame. While not necessarily a great movie, it certainly deserves a better presentation. Bendix is incredible in this film, one of the rare opportunities he had to carry the weight of a truly dramatic film. (Let us not include THE BABE RUTH STORY.)THE HAIRY APE suffers a bit from some crude direction, but overall an oddly compelling and emotionally solid (thanks to Bendix) film.
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Post by moira finnie »

I was trying to prevent bringing my dark feelings over from TCM by referring to marble mouth as Mr. Brando, but the truth is, I can't stand him!!!!

I've seen 'On the Waterfront', Sayonara, and Teahouse of the August Moon', and I think that's a prettty rounded example of his work. I saw bits and pieces of 'Streetcar' also. From what I've seen of him and his work, my opinion has been made, and I've never shied from it. I will definitely avoid TCM whenever his movies are on
Anne, I understand your reluctance to give Marlon "Mumbles" Brando another chance, and found your passionate statement of this fact very amusing, but wish that you might stumble across my favorite movie of Brando's, which is also his first, (i think):

The Men(1950).
It's on TCM tonight at 9:30 PM ET. His co-stars in this fine Fred Zinnemann film are Everett Sloane, Teresa Wright and, believe it or not, Jack Webb. The story of a parplegic soldier and his compatriots is profoundly moving and couldn't be more timely, alas. I think that Brando's performance, like Montgomery Clift's in Fred Zinnemann's The Search is naturalistic and unself-concious, unlike some of their later work.
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bobhopefan1940
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Post by bobhopefan1940 »

mrsl wrote: I can't understand a word the man speaks, don't think he's attractive, and find no 'charm' in his smile, besides thinking his 'method acting' is more than highly over-rated. I'm done, now.
:lol: How did I see this reply coming? :lol: Come now... Tell us how you really feel about Brando ;)

I feel the very same about him, really. I thought perhaps the first time I watched one of his movies it was the era I did not like, now I know he is just not for me. I still might check out some of his flicks airing tonight.
"How strange when an illusion dies. It's as though you've lost a child." --Judy Garland
"To help a friend in need is easy, but to give him your time is not always opportune." --Charlie Chaplin
"Dumb show is best for screen people, if they must appear in public." --Buster Keaton
Hollis
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Post by Hollis »

Dewey,

What did you think of William Bendix in Wake Island and Lifeboat? You're absolutely right about him not getting the chance to play the lead in a straight drama too often, but when he did, from what I've seen, he did a more than adequate job of it. It seems a shame that he's probably best remembered from the 50's sitcom The Life of Reilly. Then again, Harry Morgan (who I think is a vastly underrated actor) and Lucille Ball also "suffered" the same fate with their respective TV shows. It's funny how a person's talents can be so relatively overlooked in one medium only to find notoriety in another. Good to see you here by the way. take care.

Adios,

Hollis
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Dewey1960
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William Bendix

Post by Dewey1960 »

Hi Hollis--good to see you as well.
Re: Wm Bendix; yes he's superb in those two films. In fact I can't think of a single performace (save THE BABE RUTH STORY) where he was anything less than terrific. I especially like him as Alan Ladd's shell-shocked pal in the great Raymond Chandler-penned noir, THE BLUE DAHLIA. It's a shame, too, that his TV role of Chester A. Riley (THE LIFE OF...) has always been a source of ridicule. Truth is, it's a fine, well-sustained comic portrayal of the put-upon average American blue collar guy. A very funny (and successful!) show in its day. In fact, a genuine forerunner of Al Bundy and Homer Simpson.
Be well. - Dewey
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Post by sandykaypax »

I second Moira's recommendation of The Men. I saw it many years ago, and am looking forward to recording it tonight. Two great actors--Marlon Brando and Teresa Wright, can't beat that!

I'll probably just watch the Brando doc tonight and tomorrow and record it later in the month when they show both parts back to back.

Sandy K
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Post by filmlover »

I'm looking forward to a couple of Mary Astor films this week: There's Always A Woman (also with Joan Blondell), Blonde Fever, and Young Ideas. Later in the week, Crime Doctor's Gamble.
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