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Allegra_Blyth
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Joined: March 13th, 2008, 4:20 pm
Location: Viña del mar. Chile

Post by Allegra_Blyth »

Such good movies in TCM USA!. Here, the last good movie i saw there was "Rhapsody" with Elizabeth Taylor a week ago
jdb1

Post by jdb1 »

Question: What does TCM mean, there on the left of its first page, under Featured Articles: "Ruth Chatterton in the Race Pre-Code Drama, Female?"

Do they mean "Racy Pre-Code Drama?" At first glance I thought Hmmm, what was Ruth Chatterton doing in a "race picture?"

I guess it's the continuing erosion of education. One of their Schedule descriptions a month or two ago kept referring to the medieval scholar and prophet Nostradamus as "Nostradamas." Right idea, wrong language. I even wrote an email to someone who wrote book review or something on the site (of course I forget what it was now, my memory being what it is; after all that was more than two weeks ago) - he referred to an 18th Century English actor/director as "Cibber Colley." The man's name was, in fact, Colley Cibber. I guess the author of this piece figured no one would know the difference. Hah!

And I never got a response of any kind. Is there no such thing as an editor and/or fact checker at TCM?
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moira finnie
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Post by moira finnie »

Question: What does TCM mean, there on the left of its first page, under Featured Articles: "Ruth Chatterton in the Race Pre-Code Drama, Female?"
I noticed that error too Judith and contacted the editor about the typo. When I originally read the headline I thought that a newly discovered Chatterton picture about race relations was being touted. Then when I read the body of the piece, I realized that someone had typed e instead of y on the end of r-a-c, since in the article the adjective is racy(--well racy for 1933)! Even if one used a spellcheck before submitting the article it wouldn't have detected the error. Guess we still need humans.
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brandonlinden
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Post by brandonlinden »

Just a reminder that the John Ford/Jack Cardiff helmed Young Cassidywill be playing this Monday. This is a film based on the life of Sean O'Casey and one that has alluded me for quite some time and am looking forward to seeing.
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MissGoddess
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Post by MissGoddess »

brandonlinden wrote:Just a reminder that the John Ford/Jack Cardiff helmed Young Cassidywill be playing this Monday. This is a film based on the life of Sean O'Casey and one that has alluded me for quite some time and am looking forward to seeing.
OH MY!!!!!!!!!!!! Thank you so much for this reminder!! I saw it ages ago but now I will record it for certain! I thought Rod Taylor ( a favorite ) did marvelously well and you can see a young and fetching Julie Christie in a small part.

YippEEEEE!

:D
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mrsl
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Post by mrsl »

Allegra_Blyth:

I'm assuming you didn't watch The Lady Vanishes last night - too bad, it was a rare goodie.

Anne
Anne


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Allegra_Blyth
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Post by Allegra_Blyth »

No i didnt, cause, the programmation of TCM latin american is different than the North american :(
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mrsl
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Post by mrsl »

I'm so sorry, Allegra. I didn't notice where you were from. We have another member from Chile and he's always making comment on that.

Anne
Anne


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* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

]***********************************************************************
feaito

Post by feaito »

Allegra_Blyth wrote:No i didnt, cause, the programmation of TCM latin american is different than the North american :(
And not only that, the quality of the prints aired by TCM Latin is vastly inferior.

Allegra, if you have the VTR cable company you can try the premium channel "Cinecanal Classics"; it runs a lot of repeats, but there are very good films included in their schedule (mainly from the 1940s and 1950s).

Thanks to Cinecanal I was able to see for the first time Joan Fontaine's "Ivy" (1947), Ladd's "The Great Gatsby" (1949), Maggie Sullavan's "Back Street" (1941), "Love Letters" (1945), "The Mating Season" (1951), "The Model and the Marriage Broker" (1951), "Josette" (1938) and many more.
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Allegra_Blyth
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Post by Allegra_Blyth »

Yes!, great channel!. I ve seen a few movies in the "free premium channels weekend" and when i get some money im gonna update my subcription! :D
Lionel Barrymore`s N-1 Fan ;)
cascabel
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Post by cascabel »

I am steeling myself to watch Alice's Restaurant on the 17th--for the first time since its release. I haven't wanted to watch it again before this because I was afraid of destroying all my adolescent memories. I hope I can bear it now. :wink: It probably wasn't the best replacement for the bumped Zabriskie Point, and I know other people hate the movie (the song!), but I was fond of it. There's lots of jokiness, of course, but I remember it as mostly sad. The young people try to be light-hearted, but they are haunted by parental illness and inadequacy, by the war and draft, by their own incompetence. I was wondering if anyone else here had any interest in this movie. I'll understand, if everyone would rather forget it.
feaito

Post by feaito »

Allegra_Blyth wrote:Yes!, great channel!. I ve seen a few movies in the "free premium channels weekend" and when i get some money im gonna update my subcription! :D
Allegra,

Being a huge fan of Lionel Barrymore, have you seen him in the fantastic Tod Browning masterpiece "The Devil Doll" (1936)?? It is one of my favorite sci-fi-horror films of all time.
Ollie
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Post by Ollie »

Cascabel, I've seen ALICE'S a few times since it's original release, and none of those improved or lessened it. The slow parts are still slow, the funny parts are fine. It's rather fun to look back at some of the supporting actors who've gone on to more spotlight, and others who never did anything else.

I don't think it's a film that should be held up to a mirror of the political or social times - it's a film that SHOULD be held up as a mirror of those FILMMAKING times, however.

There were two age-opposite groups trying to make 'groovy' hip films then: old Hollywood hands who weren't in touch with the sensibilities and were easily misguided into what was 'cool' and 'hip', but at least knew how to make a film. Good technique, poor subject matter...

Then there were the newbie filmmakers who knew their subject matter, but didn't know filmmaking. Better subject matter, poor construction and storytelling techniques.

These 'bad' films are still interesting for all of those reasons, to me, because they were experimenting if only to exchange ideas and experiences. I only wish the two groups had seen the benefit of joining forces and getting good stories put together with good film techniques.

It's also a time-period that could stand out as the beginning of Non-Hollywood Money, where financiers wanted to be a part of Film History but threw money into projects without knowing right from wrong.

I personally think EASY RIDER is a terrible film to watch. I've never enjoyed it but, every 10 years or so, I'll see it in some film festival and marvel at its praise. I much prefer hearing Dennis Hopper talk about the funding and construction of the film.

I think the Post-WWII years brought about shift in American filmmaking (the Noir period, the 'more realistic' Method Acting), perhaps due to the returning war vets' interest in those kind of films. Then, 15 years later, another generation hits the pavement with more changes in mind.

I don't know if another major shift occurred 15 years after that ("the '80s"). The 70s, 80s, 90s and 21st Century films don't 'feel' substantially different from each other. Maybe someone can argue this case...
cascabel
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Post by cascabel »

Ollie--Thank you for the thoughtful reply. I dread re-watching certain movies of the 1960s because I can't easily separate out my old childish emotional reactions in order to make a fair adult critique.

It's too bad about Easy Rider. Recently, one of my brothers convinced me to look at it again. I was remembering the tedious parts correctly, but I had forgotten how beautiful the photography was. The gorgeous scenery can make you fall in love with the American road--but, then, any good automobile advertisement or travelogue could do the same, and in less time. The story, such as it is, doesn't touch my heart much. Wasn't it supposed to--or, did Hopper and Fonda simply want to make their own movie? It's sad to think of them worrying more about the finances, expecting the story would effortlessly come together and resonate with audiences forever. I imagine they had decided that they'd learned enough from more experienced filmmakers.

Thank goodness there are still a few well-trained artists among filmmakers, that there are more opportunities now for Americans of color to get their stories told. And, you're right (if I may paraphrase this way) about the changes in the film world since the end of the studio era being so small. I think filmmakers follow more than they lead. They might be guilty of emphasizing the wrong things, but they do reflect a lot of what's in the air. There was great change in everything from the American Civil War to the end of Jim Crow, and the rest feels like adjustment.

As for Alice's Restaurant--I hope I can still believe this movie has a good heart (sorry, can't think of better words), but I'm ready to be disappointed.
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