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FREDRIC MARCH

Discussion of the actors, directors and film-makers who 'made it all happen'

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JackFavell
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby JackFavell » May 12th, 2011, 12:33 pm

I saw him last night in Trade Winds with Joan Bennett. He was such a roue in this movie, making passes at every girl he saw...I half expected him to make a pass at Ralph Bellamy.

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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby kingrat » May 12th, 2011, 4:21 pm

JF, I thoroughly enjoyed Trade Winds. If you can ignore plot logic and just let the trade winds take you where they will, from suspense to romance, from comedy to travelogue to solving the mystery, this is a world of fun, with March, Joan Bennett, Ann Sothern, and Ralph Bellamy all in fine form. Dorothy Parker and her husband, Alan Campbell, were among the writers on the script. Loved the gag of March playing a little of the Chopin waltz with a segue to "Volga Boat Song" and "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Young Charms."

One of Tay Garnett's best films, and with his travel footage in the background.

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JackFavell
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby JackFavell » May 12th, 2011, 4:47 pm

That musical medley was a riot, kingrat! I enjoyed what little of the movie I saw, unfortunately I fell asleep after the first half hour. I have it recorded thank goodness.

I always laugh when I see March in two shot with an actress....wondering where his upstage hand is resting. He had a veritable feast of gorgeous starlets in this movie.

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charliechaplinfan
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby charliechaplinfan » May 13th, 2011, 2:37 pm

I'm sure it's resting just where you think it's resting :D . I watched Executive Suite remembering Shelley Winters words. Trade Winds sounds great.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

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charliechaplinfan
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby charliechaplinfan » September 28th, 2011, 2:02 pm

I watched Trade Winds today, it's a bit of everything, a bit noir, a bit screwball with Ralph Bellamy playing his goofiest character yet (Is it only me who feels sorry for this guy?) I thought the exact same thing as Wendy was thinking, where are his hands, he looked like he was having a ball playing Sam, he has that twinkle in his eye which he probably had in real life, I did find his character quite oily though, which is probably what was intended. I really enjoy Joan Benett, I think she's a really capable actress and very pretty too, she made the transition to playing more mature ladies well too, she's excellent in The Reckless Moment and Father of the Bride along with the Fritz lang films she made, it's good to see her in an earlier movie looking like she's having a ball playing Kay although I think she was way too classy for Sam.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby feaito » September 28th, 2011, 7:21 pm

Trade Winds sounds like everything I've expected it to be! ;)

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JackFavell
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby JackFavell » September 29th, 2011, 10:36 am

I agree, Alison. It's taken me years to learn to like Joan, I remembered her only as the leading lady in Man in the Iron Mask, Father of the Bride, and from Dark Shadows. She never impressed me at all, till I watched her in The Reckless Moment and the Lang films. Then I went back and watched her in Father of the Bride and was shocked at how good she is there too.

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Rita Hayworth
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby Rita Hayworth » September 29th, 2011, 10:48 am

Jack Favell, Kingrat, CCFan, and feaito:

Today or Tomorrow, I going to Blockbuster or ask my Brother (he has a Netflix account) to see I can rent Trade Winds ... this sounds like my cup of tea after reading all of your posts on the FREDRIC MARCH thread!

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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby Gary J. » September 29th, 2011, 11:16 am

The director, Tay Garnett, was an interesting character - an aviator, an independent, an adventurer who would hop on his ship and sail around the world whenever he was in between picture assignments. He wrote a marvelous book of anecdotes later in life and movies like TRADE WINDS and CHINA SEAS (35) display his restless nature.
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CineMaven
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby CineMaven » October 4th, 2011, 3:24 am

Image Image

DR. JEKYLL and MR. HYDE.

Watched this last night and March gave a fantastic performance. A well-deserved Academy Award. As dashing a young man in love could be...as his alter ego Mr. Hyde was the most sadistic lascivious vile despicable...ugh! He was a brute. Wow if make-up makes the man...

This film was re-made later by Spencer Tracy, Ingrid Bergman and Lana Turner. I'm a big Ingrid Bergman fan. And though I've never really warmed up to the actress-y shenanigans of MIRIAM HOPKINS, she gave a bravura performance in this same film. She outdid Bergman's portrayal of the same role. Awmigawd, HOPKINS' disgust, revulsion, terror and hysteria was palpable. Her rictus smile while she pretended not to be in terror was a conflicting sight to behold.The sexual masochism was extremely galling. I haven't been this uncomfortable like in...forever. This is a testimony to Fredric March.
"You build my gallows high, baby."

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JackFavell
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby JackFavell » October 4th, 2011, 11:30 am

March's character is more of a victim than Tracy's Jekyll. He's a very much more sympathetic Jekyll. I watched for a couple of minutes last night without realizing what the movie was, and didn't recognize March for a couple of seconds. I thought, "Who is that nice young actor? David Manners?" Then it came to me. DUH. :roll:

Even the way March changes into Hyde is different. He really struggles against it, falling to the floor. Finally, he's overcome by Hyde, as if Hyde were a completely different person who attacked Jekyll from the outside - like the wolf attacks Larry Talbot.

In Tracy's Jekyll, we still see traces of Hyde - his transformation is still and easy for the most part, it's his own dark side coming out.

I find March's Hyde far more frightening from a purely monstrous point of view. I think that suggestion of sexual sadism goes a long way to evoke fear.

However, Tracy's performance is frightening because Hyde is a part of his personality, inherent in his character. This is disturbing to think of, and intellectually is the more frightening prospect. Perhaps as a woman, I find the 1932 film more horrific. The 1940's version is maybe more directed at male fear?

Not that I am hoping for it, but really, why hasn't Hollywood remade this one recently? It's a terrific story that could be remade in endless ways. I bet there is an audience that would go to it on title alone.

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Rita Hayworth
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby Rita Hayworth » October 4th, 2011, 12:20 pm

JackFavell wrote:I find March's Hyde far more frightening from a purely monstrous point of view. I think that suggestion of sexual sadism goes a long way to evoke fear.

However, Tracy's performance is frightening because Hyde is a part of his personality, inherent in his character. This is disturbing to think of, and intellectually is the more frightening prospect. Perhaps as a woman, I find the 1932 film more horrific. The 1940's version is maybe more directed at male fear?

Not that I am hoping for it, but really, why hasn't Hollywood remade this one recently? It's a terrific story that could be remade in endless ways. I bet there is an audience that would go to it on title alone.


I seen both versions March's last night and Tracy's (that came out in 1941) and I feel that March's version is better than Tracy's because Jack pointed out that 1932 film (actually 1931) more horrific and since she said that I prefer March for that reason alone. As a man, both (I find) of these versions do induce fear in all of us.

I find it hard to believe is why hasn't there is a remake of this terrific story that Jack pointed out earlier; that is a very good question and believe I would love to see Hugh Jackson, Jude Law, George Clooney, or anyone can take on the role of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde at the same time. I don't who would be best for that demanding role.

Man, watching the March's version of this classic tale was a treat for the ages ... incredible photography and visual effects. Man, I just love old movies like this one!

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charliechaplinfan
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby charliechaplinfan » October 4th, 2011, 1:56 pm

This isn't really my kind of story but the 1931 version just has it all, I'm hit and miss with Miriam Hopkins, mostly liking her, she strikes it right here, it's pretty near to the knuckle here, the sexiness is quite palpable, Fredric March delivers one of his best preformances. I've never seen Tracy's version but I have seen Jack Barrymore's early one, it's good but not a patch on this.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

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JackFavell
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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby JackFavell » October 4th, 2011, 2:12 pm

I think it's one of March's best and Hopkins is outstanding here too.

There is something tamped down in the Tracy version. Maybe the studio couldn't handle the racier content.

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Re: FREDRIC MARCH

Postby CineMaven » October 5th, 2011, 8:34 am

JACK FAVELL wrote:March's character is more of a victim than Tracy's Jekyll. He's a very much more sympathetic Jekyll. I watched for a couple of minutes last night without realizing what the movie was, and didn't recognize March for a couple of seconds. I thought, "Who is that nice young actor? David Manners?" Then it came to me. DUH. :roll:

I have to laugh because I did a double-take as well. I knew the voice...but I had to squint my eyes and say "Freddie?" But David Manners is a good "mistake."

* * * *
Even the way March changes into Hyde is different. He really struggles against it, falling to the floor. Finally, he's overcome by Hyde, as if Hyde were a completely different person who attacked Jekyll from the outside - like the wolf attacks Larry Talbot.

I'll have to see Tracy's version more recently. I did feel March gave a more emotional performance when he was begging to break off his engagement...and emotional in struggling against becoming Hyde. Now I might not have been paying attention as closely (I had it on while I was working at my computer...I wasn't sitting and watching it), so tell me...isn't Hyde the darker carnal side of Dr. Jekyll? Doesn't he come from within the good doctor.

* * * *
I find March's Hyde far more frightening from a purely monstrous point of view. I think that suggestion of sexual sadism goes a long way to evoke fear.

I'd agree ma petite soeur. March looked like he abandoned all constraints and (as an actor) just friggin' WENT FOR IT. Eeeeewwwwwww my skin is crawly just thinking about his paws all over Miriam. Again...Kudoes to Ms. Hopkins. And speaking of paws...monsters sure have really baaaad hair days. What was up with that 'do and his simian features?? I won't go there...but I really want to go there...but well...you know what I mean. But I won't go there.

* * * *
However, Tracy's performance is frightening because Hyde is a part of his personality, inherent in his character. This is disturbing to think of, and intellectually is the more frightening prospect. Perhaps as a woman, I find the 1932 film more horrific. The 1940's version is maybe more directed at male fear?

Let me peel the onion just a tad more. So is this also part of [b]Tracy's personality? Does he have something in him...does an Actor have something in THEM in the first place, to call upon to pull out those personalities.? (Does that sentence make sense? It makes sense in my head, but I can't get it to come out the way it sounds inside. I know...it's those thoughts of Boyer. "Get outta my head Frenchy!")

* * * *
Not that I am hoping for it, but really, why hasn't Hollywood remade this one recently? It's a terrific story that could be remade in endless ways. I bet there is an audience that would go to it on title alone."]

That's a great idea. No. No wait...that's a frightening idea. They might give the role to Leonardo DiCaprio or James Franco or Robert Downey Jr. or the "Twilight" guy. Noohhhhh, not Rod Serling. Well they've already done "Dr. Jekyll and Sister Hyde."[/b] Maybe they can go with "Dr. Jekyll and Brutha Hyde." Okay okay okay...I said I wasn't going to go there...

* * * *
There is something tamped down in the Tracy version. Maybe the studio couldn't handle the racier content.

I think you've hit it on the head there. M-G-M had more stars than there were in Heaven...but they whitewashed 'em like Spic and Span. They can't handle the truth!!!

* * * *
CHARLIECHAPLINFAN wrote:This isn't really my kind of story but the 1931 version just has it all, I'm hit and miss with Miriam Hopkins, mostly liking her, she strikes it right here, it's pretty near to the knuckle here, the sexiness is quite palpable, Fredric March delivers one of his best preformances. I've never seen Tracy's version but I have seen Jack Barrymore's early one, it's good but not a patch on this.


Hmmmmm...I wonder what the ol' Hambone, I mean the Great Profeel, would have done with this role. It IS a meaty one. I'm curious.
"You build my gallows high, baby."

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