The most important thing is to enjoy your life - to be happy - it's all that matters.
- Audrey Hepburn

Loretta Young

Discussion of the actors, directors and film-makers who 'made it all happen'

Moderators: Sue Sue Applegate, movieman1957, moira finnie, Lzcutter

User avatar
moira finnie
Administrator
Posts: 8176
Joined: April 9th, 2007, 6:34 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Re: Loretta Young

Postby moira finnie » January 7th, 2013, 4:18 pm

CineMaven wrote:Robert Williams is amazing. I would say he's a precursor to Lee Tracy, but that might make some folks wretch. ( I like the loud bombastic irascible Lee! )


I always think that Robert Williams had an unusual relaxed style that may have been copied by Bing Crosby. That comparison may put people off, but he is excellent in this film and might have had an interesting career had he lived. Don't kill me, Harlow fans, but working with Capra in Platinum Blonde, it seems to be the only movie where I can see that she was a genuinely pretty girl with a natural sensuality and humor that was erased after the MGM glam machine was done "streamlining" her. I like her in Bombshell, Redheaded Woman, and Dinner at Eight too, but she never seems remotely human in those, even though she is often funny. Loretta's role in Platinum Blonde was interesting since she was clearly supposed to be seen as a plain Jane (were all these reporters too juiced to see her clearly?), but an individual with a mind as well.

Re: Taxi!...Loretta + Cagney should have been a team that appeared again! If only...The Truth About Youth was awful except when Myrna Loy showed up as Kara the Firefly (bad girl!). David Manners was only interesting one time I've seen him, in Crooner (1932) as a Rudy Vallee type, and it sure didn't help that his loved ones in "Truth About..." kept calling him "The Imp." Was there ever anyone less impish? Conway Tearle, who had a long theatrical career, along with his equally starchy brother Godfrey, was so stodgy I hoped that Loretta would meet someone other than the foolish boy and this doddering stiff.
Avatar: Frank McHugh (1898-1981)

The Skeins
TCM Movie Morlocks

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby JackFavell » January 7th, 2013, 4:37 pm

I thought the Truth About Youth was hilarious.

User avatar
moira finnie
Administrator
Posts: 8176
Joined: April 9th, 2007, 6:34 pm
Location: Earth
Contact:

Re: Loretta Young

Postby moira finnie » January 7th, 2013, 5:14 pm

JackFavell wrote:I thought the Truth About Youth was hilarious.

Yeah. I know what you mean. The whole thing must have been a joke. :wink:
Avatar: Frank McHugh (1898-1981)

The Skeins
TCM Movie Morlocks

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby JackFavell » January 7th, 2013, 5:23 pm

One hopes so, but... oh lordy don't get me started. I should have known as soon as the first IMP came out of someone's mouth...

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby charliechaplinfan » January 8th, 2013, 9:20 am

Loretta was good with Cagney, they never made another movie together? What a shame. She makes Spencer Tracy sexy (sorry Spence fans, I've never seen him as sexy apart from this one time with Loretta) she has such a sensibility coupled with a little girl lost look that works well with any leading man. I'd love to watch her with Gable.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

RedRiver
Posts: 4209
Joined: July 28th, 2011, 9:42 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby RedRiver » January 8th, 2013, 5:00 pm

Robert Williams...might have had an interesting career had he lived

When I rented this movie, the guy at the video store said exactly that. Was the actor killed in an accident?

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby JackFavell » January 8th, 2013, 5:19 pm

The guy at your video store knows Robert Williams? Sign him up for the SSO.

User avatar
CineMaven
Posts: 3818
Joined: September 24th, 2007, 9:54 am
Location: Brooklyn, New York
Contact:

Re: Loretta Young

Postby CineMaven » January 8th, 2013, 6:34 pm

Image

JEAN HARLOW ( 1911 - 1937 ) and ROBERT WILLIAMS ( 1897 - 1931 )

IMDB wrote:...Bobby was rehearsing with Constance Bennett for his next RKO picture, Lady with a Past (1932), when he complained of stomach pains. After a day or two the pain worsened, and despite his protests Williams was rushed to a hospital for an appendicitis operation. Before the operation was completed his appendix burst. Days later, on November 3, 1931, Williams died of peritonitis. He was 34 years old. Platinum Blonde (1931) had been released just four days earlier, and the first reviews proclaimed that Hollywood had a new star. Instead, Robert Williams became one of Hollywood's great might-have-beens.
"You build my gallows high, baby."

http://www.megramsey.com

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby charliechaplinfan » January 9th, 2013, 1:31 pm

It seems hard to believe in this day and age that appendicitis could kill so quickly, yet it must have been one of the biggest killers of the young in those days.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

User avatar
mrsl
Posts: 4220
Joined: April 14th, 2007, 5:20 pm
Location: Chicago SW suburbs

Re: Loretta Young

Postby mrsl » January 31st, 2013, 6:10 pm


CAUSE FOR ALARM

I saw this one years ago (not on TCM but when I was much younger), and at the time, I didn't appreciate it for the little gem it was. At least that's my opinion. Loretta plays scared and afraid to a tea with her big, expressive eyes. With a husband, dying of heart trouble who is losing his mind, she goes through hours of torment trying to regain a letter he had written which accuses her and his doctor of a conspiracy to kill him. Having given the letter to the postman thinking it was about new insurance laws as her husband (Barry Sullivan), had informed her . . . when he abruptly snaps and tells her how he planned her punishment for a suspected affair between her and the doctor (an old friend of both of them), he has a fatal heart attack leaving her to attempt to retrieve the letter before it goes to the D.A. Oddly, the postman, a grumbley old fellow who is more than happy to complain to anyone who will listen and talk for any amount of time, decides to follow the rule book to the letter and not return the letter to her unless upon thinking about it, will give it if she will drive him to the post office. So, bla, bla, bla as more events occur to detain her and cause her more anxiety. She makes me mindful of Barbara Stanwyck's torment in Sorry Wrong Number and the tense atmosphere she creates. Every phone ring, and door knocking causes more worry, and making me utter "Oh, no" over and over.

I also wonder what happened to Bruce Cowling who played the doctor. He was quite an attractive man, yet I don't recall seeing him in anything else. Well, I looked him up on imdB and although I saw a lot of the movies he was in, he was apparently such a small part player, he doesn't stick out at all, however, I will be watching for him on some of the TV shows and western movies listed.

If you missed it, you might want to check it out next time it's on.
.
Anne


***********************************************************************
* * * * * * * * What is past is prologue. * * * * * * * *

]***********************************************************************

User avatar
JackFavell
Posts: 11946
Joined: April 20th, 2009, 9:56 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby JackFavell » February 1st, 2013, 9:41 am

After reading your description, I realized I'd seen this one before, I never knew the name of it. It's quite effective, I think it's kind of like those novels we call 'a real page turner'. You can't stop watching once it's hooked you. The suspense is neatly done.

RedRiver
Posts: 4209
Joined: July 28th, 2011, 9:42 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby RedRiver » February 1st, 2013, 1:57 pm

I remember this one too. Like the two of you, I simply relish "edge of the seat" suspense. I read those page turners all the time. My smart friends say, "Don't you ever read anything serious?" Why? Real life is serious!

User avatar
movieman1957
Administrator
Posts: 5497
Joined: April 15th, 2007, 3:50 pm
Location: MD

Re: Loretta Young

Postby movieman1957 » March 6th, 2014, 8:53 am

I caught Capra's "Platinum Blonde." Overall I liked it. Miss Maven's explanation a couple of posts back explains why I've never heard of Robert Williams. He was good. Such a laid back style and an easy delivery makes him very easy to like. Loretta Young had top billing but she had less to do than Williams or Jean Harlow. I did like the chemistry between him and Harlow.

I though the first half was fun though it made me more smile than laugh. Then somewhere after the marriage the film almost came to a grinding halt. I thought more fun could have been made out of his giving in after his resistance to living in Harlow's family mansion, and give up working and having a butler but as things became strained it lost a lot of steam.

The last quarter picked up and had the predictable "correct" ending for the film. Not a lot of Capra touches in the film but it's early. Good performances and some good lines help it along.

A fine print from Netflix.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

RedRiver
Posts: 4209
Joined: July 28th, 2011, 9:42 am

Re: Loretta Young

Postby RedRiver » March 6th, 2014, 1:25 pm

I wanted to like PLATINUM BLONDE, as I appreciate Capra. It just feels awkward to me. Like the actors are forcing themselves to tell a story even they don't believe. It's been said that it has an improvisational feel to it. I agree. The problem is, the results come up short. There's a painful scene where reporter and society girl adlib a song. Please stop!

User avatar
movieman1957
Administrator
Posts: 5497
Joined: April 15th, 2007, 3:50 pm
Location: MD

Re: Loretta Young

Postby movieman1957 » March 6th, 2014, 1:44 pm

That "song scene" you refer to was Williams and Harlow. I didn't mind it at first but it went on way too long. That was awkward.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."


Return to “The People of Film”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests