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Coming to a Theatre Near You!

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Moraldo Rubini
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Marvelous Marvin

Postby Moraldo Rubini » May 11th, 2007, 12:33 pm

Thanks Judith!

Here's an overview and schedule of the Lee Marvin Festival. Take note that the schedule seems to be a little mercurial (a few cancelled screenings already):

http://www.filmlinc.com/wrt/onsale/leemarvin/program.html

Pamela Marvin will be at this afternoon's screening of Bad Day at Black Rock; as well as Seven Men from Now on May 16 & 19, and Ship of Fools on May 20.

Director John Boorman will be at tonight's screenings of Point Blank and his documentary Lee Marvin: A Personal Portrait, as well as tomorrow's screening of Hell in the Pacific.

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Postby MissGoddess » May 11th, 2007, 2:24 pm

Yippee!! I am going tomorrow at 4:00 to see The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance. My first big screen John Ford movie.

Many thanks to LZcutter for PMing me about this post!

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Moraldo Rubini
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Marvin Movie Mania and Marcello Mastroianni Magic

Postby Moraldo Rubini » May 11th, 2007, 11:30 pm

Miss Goddess, Judith, other Manhattanites:

If you're going to one on Sunday, please let me know and maybe I'll join you for some popcorn!

Lordy, I just saw that on Wednesday, May 16, the Film Society of Lincoln Center will be showing Le Notti Bianche at 8:15pm. This is one of my all-time favorite films; the movie that made Marcello Mastroianni a star. It also features the legendary Jean Marais (the Beast from Jean Cocteau's La Belle et la Bete) and a most beguiling Maria Schell. One of the most romantic movies around, Visconti's black and white images are stunning -- especially the scenes of snowfall blanketing the working class neighborhood of this Italian town. To see this on the big screen, to hear Nino Rota's haunting score... I can't imagine a better night. And I'll be at work, just blocks from this screening. Won't one of my New York neighbors see this so that I can live vicariously through your experience?

http://www.filmlinc.com/wrt/onsale/whitenights.html

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Postby MissGoddess » May 15th, 2007, 12:12 pm

Hi Moraldo! I'm sorry I couldn't do that on Sunday---to see Marcello on the big screen sure would be delightful!

However, I am still dizzy from the stunning effects of seeing John Ford's The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance on the big screen at Walter Reade. Words fail, it was that incredible.

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Moraldo Rubini
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San Francisco Silent Film Festival

Postby Moraldo Rubini » May 28th, 2007, 8:43 pm

This July's Silent Film Festival schedule has been announced. Opening with Ramon Novarro and Norma Shearer in Ernst Lubitsch' 1927 telling of The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg on Friday the 13th, 2007. This classic romance will be paired with Beauty Spots in America: Hot Springs, Arizona from 1916; a 28mm rarity that has been newly transferred to 35mm. With accompaniment by Dennis James on the Mighty Wurlitzer.

Following will be:

Saturday July 14:

Four Hal Roach comedies: Just a Good Guy, The Boy Friend, Fast Company with Our Gang, and Movie Night with Charley Chase. Live piano accompaniment by Donald Sosin. 10:30am

Doris Kenyon in 1927's The Valley of the Giants; with How the Cowboy Makes his Lariat (1917). Live piano accompaniment by Stephen Horne. 1:15pm

The Italian feature Maciste. This is the first of a series about the superhuman played by Barolomeo Pagano. It's paired with 1917's His Wife's Hero. Both are newly restored by the Cineteca di Bologna. Live piano accompaniment by Donald Sosin. 3:30pm

Camille, starring Alla Nazimova and Rudolph Valentino. Special guests at this screening will be Charles Tabesh and TCM's Robert Osborn! Paired with 1917's Her Obsession, this evening will be presented with accompaniment on the Mighty Wurlizter by Clark Wilson. 5:45pm

The all-star cast of Wallace Beery, Richard Arlen and Louise Brooks is featured in William Wellman's Beggars of Life. Special guests are Patrick Loughney from the George Eastman House (who struck this new 35mm print) and William Wellman, Jr.! This movie will be paired with 1917's Hoodwinking the Police.

Sunday, July 15:

The day begins with the FREE program, More Amazing Tales from the Archives: a behind-the-scenes look at the world of silent film preservation. Rob Stone and Patrick Loughney (from the George Eastman House) will focus on the preservation of "peripheral" films -- trailers, newsreels, shorts and fragments; as well abandoned formats, such as 28mm. With piano accompaniment by Donald Osin. 10:30am

Direct from Paris, Retour de Flamme ("Saved from the Flames") is a collection of short films from 1900-1928 and directed by such french directors as Georges Méliès, Gaston Velle and Ferdinand Zecca. From the collection of Serge Bromberg, who will accompany the films on the piano. 12:45pm

Cecil B. DeMille's brother William DeMille directed the Pulitzer Prize winning play Miss Lulu Bett; which will be paired with 1915's 28mm rarity In the Shadow of the Pyramids, newly transferred to a new 35mm print. With accompaniment by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra.

Cineast and author Eddie Muller will introduce Anthony Asquith's suspense feature A Cottage on Dartmoor, with piano accompaniment by Stephen Horne. Paired with the 28mm rarity (newly transferred to 35mm) Lonesome Luke's Lively Life. 6:00pm

Cecil B. DeMille's The Godless Girl starring Lina Basquette, Marie Prevost, James Duryea, Noah Beery and Eddie Quillan. Introduced by Scott Simmon of the National Film Preservation Foundation. Paired with 1915's Mushroom Growing (a 28mm rarity, newly converted to 35mm). Accompanied on the Mighty Wurlitzer by Dennis James. 8:45pm

jdb1

Ella Raines Film Festival

Postby jdb1 » June 19th, 2007, 3:20 pm

Here I am at the office listening to Internet radio with an old-fashioned ear plug. Today I'm listening to KIXI-AM, a syndicated package station out of Seattle that's actually pretty good -- they play music from the 40s, 50s and 60s. It's not really an "oldies" station so much as a "nostalgia" station, and they have personable DJs who give us some patter to make us feel that they are really with us, rather than just announcing the songs in that creepy way that most syndie stations do.

Anyway, I just now heard an announcement about an Ella Raines Film Festival this weekend, and I thought I'd pass that information on to any posters in the Pacific Northwest who might be interested.

The festival is sponsored by the Snoqualmie Valley Historical Society -- Ella Raines was a local girl. The North Bend Theater will host the show, Friday through Sunday. North Bend is about 30 miles outside of Seattle, according to the website, ellarainesfilmfest.org.

They are showing Tall in the Saddle, Hail the Conquering Hero, Phantom Lady, The Senator Was Indiscreet, and The Suspect.

Sounds like fun - there should be more small festivals like this for the secondary stars and character actors.

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John Wayne in New York

Postby MissGoddess » June 20th, 2007, 10:22 am

It looks like I will finally get to see The Searchers on the big screen. The Museum of Modern Art in Manhattan is doing its own centennial retrospective on the Duke starting tonight.

http://www.moma.org/exhibitions/film_ex ... f=calendar

jdb1

Postby jdb1 » June 20th, 2007, 10:55 am

Re: Ella Raines

As an unfortunate coincidence, General Robin Olds, Raines' husband, has passed away, and his obituary appears in the New York Times this morning. A courageous and strikingly good looking man.

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Moraldo Rubini
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I got the fever!

Postby Moraldo Rubini » June 28th, 2007, 1:10 am

Barbara Stanwyck Fever is spreading across the country. 2007 is Stanwyck's Centennial, and film festivals devoted to this remarkable actress seem to be popping up all over. Miss Goddess already informed us about the Brooklyn series, TCM did their part in May, and the San Francisco Bay Area has gone stark raving Stanwyck this summer. I just got in from an evening of the women's prison pic Ladies They Talk About along with the effervescent Preston Sturges film, The Lady Eve at The Castro. The Pacific Film Archive is also joining suit. If you're in the area, check it out (if not, perhaps it's just a matter of time before she comes to you!):

The Castro

June 26:
Ball of Fire
Forty Guns


June 27:
Ladies They Talk About
The Lady Eve


June 28:
Baby Face
Remember the Night


June 29:
Ball of Fire
Forty Guns


Pacific Film Archives

July 6:
Night Nurse
Stella Dallas


July 8:
Ball of Fire
Forty Guns


July 12:
There's Always Tomorrow
All I Desire


July 17:
Baby Face
Remember the Night


July 26:
Double Indemnity
Clash by Night


July 31:
Ladies They Talk About
The Lady Eve

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Moraldo Rubini
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Re: San Francisco Silent Film Festival

Postby Moraldo Rubini » July 14th, 2007, 1:00 am

I wrote:This July's Silent Film Festival schedule has been announced. Opening with Ramon Novarro and Norma Shearer in Ernst Lubitsch' 1927 telling of The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg on Friday the 13th, 2007. This classic romance will be paired with Beauty Spots in America: Hot Springs, Arizona from 1916; a 28mm rarity that has been newly transferred to 35mm. With accompaniment by Dennis James on the Mighty Wurlitzer.


Pardon me for responding to my own post, but I thought I'd update my Silent Film Festival notice since I just got in from the opening movie. The sold-out theatre was studded with faces familiar to classic film fans: Leonard Maltin, Robert Osborn, Mick LaSalle. Eddie Mueller were all in attendance. The 28mm short subject travelogue regarding Hot Springs, Arizona made even the most mundane scenes interesting. The title card would hail the excellent roads for auto, but the footage showed cars traveling on what would be considered dirt trails today; crossing babbling brooks (without the benefit of a bridge) at one point. It would be interesting to view the sights today, to see how they've changed since 1916.

Lubitsch' version of The Student Prince (without the Sig Romburg songs) was a fun view to the early work of Norma Shearer in the ingenue role and Ramon Navarro looking downright innocent without his Ben-Hur garb. 'Twas also great to see the amiable Jean Hersholt as the Prince's mentor. Everything about the guy suggested warmth and love. It's easy to imagine why the Academy's Humanitarian Award is named for this legendary actor. I understand that Lubitsch shot a lot of this film in Heidelberg, but none of this footage was actually used and all was reshot in Hollywood. Anyone know why?

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Postby Lzcutter » July 14th, 2007, 1:33 am

Moraldo,

Are you going to the Robert Osborne/Charles Tabish hosted screening tomorrow?

If so, please report back!

Glad you enjoyed the Opening Night.

Incredibly jealous in the Southland (and beyond),
Lynn in Lake Balboa

"Film is history. With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other and to ourselves."

"For me, John Wayne has only become more impressive over time." Marty Scorsese

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Moraldo Rubini
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Bob n Chuck

Postby Moraldo Rubini » July 15th, 2007, 1:28 am

Lzcutter wrote:Are you going to the Robert Osborne/Charles Tabish hosted screening tomorrow?

Alas Lynn, I spent the day at the very exciting Giants/Dodgers game; then made it to the latter screening of William Wellman's Beggars of Life. I met a friend there, who'd kindly saved a seat for me, as he saw the previous show of Camille, which was introduced by Robert Osborne and TCM programmer Charles Tabish. According to my pal, they were well received and gave informative talks before the movie. Wish I could have seen them...

Beggars of Life was preceded by a 1917 comedy short Hoodwinking the Police. A battle-of-the-sexes comedy, featuring two women (who live together and wear men's clothing -- perhaps TCM should have considered this for programming last month?) who become police and play practical jokes on their male counterparts. The film seemed to be all for equal rights for women; a surprising take for a movie made three years before the passing of the 19th Amendment.

Louise Brooks and Richard Arlen made a dazzling pair -- even though they apparently hated each other off-screen -- in Beggars of Life. This film balanced comedy with brutal reality; the characters were more complex than many seen in movies today. She was a murderer saved by sociopath-with-a-heart-of-gold Oklahoma Red (Wallace Beery). Wellman's camera work was beautiful. His use of lap dissolves, double-exposure, and well rehearsed stunts (filmed in real time) were brilliant. Wellman's son spoke about Louise Brooks after the movie ended. What a swell night!

If only the Giants had beat the Dodgers...

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Stanwyck in Boston

Postby MissGoddess » July 17th, 2007, 10:11 am

Continuing the honors for Miss Barbara Stanwyck's centennial, Boston will be running a series of her films. More info here:

http://bostonist.com/2007/07/17/barbara_stanwyc.php

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Moraldo Rubini
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Here Come de Judge!

Postby Moraldo Rubini » July 17th, 2007, 4:23 pm

I wrote:
The sold-out theatre was studded with faces familiar to classic film fans: Leonard Maltin, Robert Osborn, Mick LaSalle. Eddie Mueller were all in attendance.

A few days ago I dropped [with a "thud"] these names of attendees to the opening of San Francisco's Silent Film Festival. But it seems I missed one! From today's San Francisco Chronicle:
The 12th annual San Francisco Silent Film Festival began Friday night with The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg, a jolly tale strong on scenes of wholesome young Aryans in embroidered jackets lifting their steins in unison. Organist Dennis James supplied two hearty hours' worth of inspired music during the movie; the Castro's mezzanine had been turned into a beer garden, and later, "accordian princess" Big Lou's band wailed away on "The Clarinet Polka" and other favorites of cornball connoisseurs. Among the guests was California Chief Justice Ron George.

The San Francisco Film Society's Miguel Pendas mentioned that it was well known in Hollywood that the star of the movie, Ramon Novarro, was gay. In October 1968, his movie career long over, he was murdered by two hustlers he'd picked up. As a deputy attorney general, George had worked on prosecuting the appeal of Novarro's attackers, who were found guilty.

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A Certain Young Man...from Durango, Mexico

Postby benwhowell » July 17th, 2007, 5:57 pm

Image

Ramon Navarro really filled the "void" left from the death of Valentino. Too bad "In Gay Madrid" (1930) didn't make the cut during the "screened out" series. There is great "chemistry" between Navarro and David Scott.
I'd love to find a copy of the book, "Bloody Wednesday-"about his tragic murder.
I read, at IMDb that he made $10,000 a week for "Ben Hur: A Tale Of The Christ" (1925)!!


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