The most important thing is to enjoy your life - to be happy - it's all that matters.
- Audrey Hepburn

The Beatles

Chit-chat, current events

Moderators: Sue Sue Applegate, movieman1957, moira finnie, Lzcutter

User avatar
movieman1957
Administrator
Posts: 5498
Joined: April 15th, 2007, 3:50 pm
Location: MD

Re: The Beatles

Postby movieman1957 » January 4th, 2012, 4:40 pm

I also like "Revolver" and maybe "Rubber Soul" right behind it. As for "Pepper" it is not at the writing level of the others but I think it is a wonder for your ears. The sounds and the instrumentation still are first rate in my view even if the songs aren't.

I am not that fond of "Good Morning Good Morning" but "Lovely Rita" and "Fixing A Hole" are fun and played like it. But "A Day In The Life" may be the best recording (and with a pretty good lyric) they did.

Put "Help" among my favorites.

What do you like about "Beatles '65"?
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

User avatar
ChiO
Posts: 3924
Joined: January 2nd, 2008, 1:26 pm
Location: Chicago

Re: The Beatles

Postby ChiO » January 4th, 2012, 5:38 pm

You're asking a film noir obsessive?

"I'm a Loser" and "No Reply". Lennon could sure write'em. Oh, and the Cornell Woolrich song, "Baby's in Black."
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

User avatar
Dewey1960
Posts: 2514
Joined: April 17th, 2007, 7:52 am
Location: Oakland, CA

Re: The Beatles

Postby Dewey1960 » January 4th, 2012, 7:15 pm

ChiO asked: Out of morbid curiosity: How does Sgt Pepper's.... hold up for folks, especially for those of you who bought it in 1967?

I plunked down my dough for SGT PEPPER back in June 1967 and, like virtually everyone else in the world, thought it was just about the greatest record ever made.
Time has altered that view considerably, although I still find it to be a pleasurable listening experience. Oddly enough, the tunes don't play that well out of context; they don't mix
well with strangers. With the possible exception of....(then and still my fave track on the album)
[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jk0dBZ1meio[/youtube]

User avatar
ChiO
Posts: 3924
Joined: January 2nd, 2008, 1:26 pm
Location: Chicago

Re: The Beatles

Postby ChiO » January 4th, 2012, 7:26 pm

With the exception of Within You Without You, I absolutely loved
every song back in June 1967 (I bought it in monaural -- how lame
is that? But it was a buck cheaper!). Now there's A Day in the Life
and Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds, but my favorite is one that seemed
like a throwaway at the time:

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xoJGDC10lZw[/youtube]
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

User avatar
movieman1957
Administrator
Posts: 5498
Joined: April 15th, 2007, 3:50 pm
Location: MD

Re: The Beatles

Postby movieman1957 » January 4th, 2012, 9:09 pm

ChiO wrote:You're asking a film noir obsessive?

"I'm a Loser" and "No Reply". Lennon could sure write'em. Oh, and the Cornell Woolrich song, "Baby's in Black."


I had a feeling. I really like "No Reply." I think it is an interesting story and I like the music. I think the final chord is very clever and sounds great. "I'll Be Back" is pretty good too as I like the minor chords.

Okay, is "Mr. Moonlight" as hated as it is reported to be?

I never thought of "Sgt. Pepper" (title track) as a throwaway because it kicked the whole thing off. It wasn't going to get any airplay (except for when they played it combined with "With A Little Help") but it fits it so well. Now "When I'm 64" was a throwaway but I guess as long as you're writing every other style you might as well throw that one in.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

User avatar
Rita Hayworth
Posts: 10098
Joined: February 6th, 2011, 4:01 pm

Re: The Beatles

Postby Rita Hayworth » January 4th, 2012, 9:39 pm

Sgt Pepper Album was very popular in the Northwest. I remember my older brothers been waiting eons trying to get this record in their hands ever since its came out in 1967. I was 8 years old at that time and one most popular songs for both University of Washington and Washington State University was "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and "Good Morning Good Morning". Also Popular was "A Day in the Life" as well as "She Leaving Home".

User avatar
Lzcutter
Administrator
Posts: 3180
Joined: April 12th, 2007, 6:50 pm
Location: Lake Balboa and the City of Angels!
Contact:

Re: The Beatles

Postby Lzcutter » January 4th, 2012, 10:13 pm

Sir Paul's new album, still untitled, will be released February 7th and is an album of songs that inspired him and John.


I heard on the radio today that the album will apparently be titled Kisses on the Bottom.
Lynn in Lake Balboa

"Film is history. With every foot of film lost, we lose a link to our culture, to the world around us, to each other and to ourselves."

"For me, John Wayne has only become more impressive over time." Marty Scorsese

Avatar-Warner Bros Water Tower

User avatar
MichiganJ
Posts: 1406
Joined: May 20th, 2008, 4:37 pm
Contact:

Re: The Beatles

Postby MichiganJ » January 5th, 2012, 12:06 pm

ChiO wrote:Out of morbid curiosity: How does Sgt Pepper's.... hold up for folks, especially for those of you who bought it in 1967?


Ten years later for my discovery of the album, but I think Pepper is probably the most dated of The Beatles' albums, with the exception of Please Please Me (or, in the U.S. The Early Beatles). But Pepper is still the landmark album, and whenever a band makes a change in their "sound" on a particular album, it's frequently referred to as their Pepper. (The Stones, obviously, was Their Satanic Majesties Request; Dylan's, arguably, is The Basement Tapes ; Elvis' Imperial Bedroom; R.E.M. Automatic For the People, etc.)

The album still works for me as a whole, but it is very much '67. I would include Magical Mystery Tour in the "dated '67-ish sound, too. But I'll humbly disagree with our esteemed Dewey, for I think many tracks from Pepper, when heard out of the context of the album, hold up very well and feel less dated than the album does as a whole. I completely agree about Getting Better, it's opening chords work great when producing mix-tapes (or spinning tunes for the college radio station), but Fixing a Hole also works, She's Leaving Home (schmaltzy as the arrangement is), Rita and Sixty-Four, too. To me, it's Lennon's tunes that are the most dated. They are the most psychedelic in production, which firmly sets their time. I Am the Walrus and to a lesser extent Strawberry Fields do, also. (I find it fascinating that, as a writer, Lennon went from the introspection of I'm a Looser, You've Got to Hide Your Love Away, In My Life, etc., to then write the more lyrically and musically, let's say, ambitious, tunes like Walrus and Lucy in the Sky, to then returning to the personal, I'm So Tired; Everybody's Got Something to Hide…; Don't Let Me Down; Ballad of John and Yoko, etc., not to mention his solo works.--BTW--I love Lennon's psychedelic songs, many of them being all-time favs. Co Co Ca Choo!)

While I love Forever Changes, it really feels '67 to me, too. Other '67 albums that feel dated to me include: The Moody Blues--Days of Futures Passed; The Airplanes' Surrealistic Pillow (what a great album); Van Morrisons' Blowin' Your Mind; Buffalo Springfields' debut. But Dylan, for me, from Bringing It All Home on, is timeless. The first four "folk" albums, including one of his best, Freewheelin', date quite a bit to me, however. (Although it's interesting how many of the songs seem to be about current events.

Of the Capital albums, Beatles VI is one of my favorites (Bad Boy--the U.S. gets a Beatle song that isn't released in Great Britain until '66!/I Don't Want To Spoil the Party/Dizzy Miss Lizzie and the wonderful 3-point harmony in the solemn Yes It Is are among my favorite earlier tunes). I also really love Yesterday and Today (The U.S. gets an early peek at three Revolver tracks, plus great "leftover" tracks from Rubber Soul and Help!)
"Let's be independent together." Dr. Hermey DDS

User avatar
movieman1957
Administrator
Posts: 5498
Joined: April 15th, 2007, 3:50 pm
Location: MD

Re: The Beatles

Postby movieman1957 » January 5th, 2012, 12:45 pm

I really liked the Capitol version of "Revolver" until I got the British version and that made it even better. "Please Please Me" suffers and benefits from its one day recording. It's exciting but not as interesting musically as "With The Beatles."

"Strawberry Fields Forever" and "I Am The Walrus" are among my favorites to listen to. They may be so '67 but I think part of that, for me, is that music I know didn't sound like that in any other group or maybe even attempted again. (It is hard to think that "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away" and "Strawberry Fields" are two years apart.

As far as The Moody Blues go "Days of Future Passed" I like least of the original seven. While it is a very clever idea several of the songs are not that interesting for me and I've never liked the recording of it. It always sounded muffled and thin. (The remaster helps but I hoped it would have been much clearer.)

BTW, I have "Beatles VI" on LP with that awful lime green label. (I don't think I have it on the rainbow Capitol label, if it came out with it.)
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

User avatar
MichiganJ
Posts: 1406
Joined: May 20th, 2008, 4:37 pm
Contact:

Re: The Beatles

Postby MichiganJ » January 5th, 2012, 1:13 pm

movieman1957 wrote:It is hard to think that "You've Got To Hide Your Love Away" and "Strawberry Fields" are two years apart.

I'm with you there. It's even harder to believe that it was only eight years spanning Love Me Do to Get Back
movieman1957 wrote:I have "Beatles VI" on LP with that awful lime green label. (I don't think I have it on the rainbow Capitol label, if it came out with it.)
.
The lime green label is a Capital reissue from the early '70s, just before all of the Capital albums were re-released with the Apple label. As ugly as it is, because there was such a limited pressing, the lime green edition of the albums are often more valuable than the original pressings.
"Let's be independent together." Dr. Hermey DDS

User avatar
movieman1957
Administrator
Posts: 5498
Joined: April 15th, 2007, 3:50 pm
Location: MD

Re: The Beatles

Postby movieman1957 » January 5th, 2012, 2:09 pm

I also have a few of the LPs with the retro purple label. (I think those came from the early 80s. They still sound good with "The Beatles Second Album" and "Something New.") And a few with the original rainbow. I think with "Abbey Road" I have four issues of it. There is the original pressing, the Half Speed Master album and then the two CDs. It's the same with "Magical Mystery Tour." I guess over 40 years there are worse things I could have done with my money.
Chris

"Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana."

kingrat
Posts: 2207
Joined: August 20th, 2009, 2:46 pm

Re: The Beatles

Postby kingrat » January 5th, 2012, 4:18 pm

I also have the EASY RIDER backlash phenomenon ChiO mentioned. BONNIE AND CLYDE, THE GRADUATE, MEDIUM COOL, etc.--I have no idea how good these films actually are and trust my judgment (then or now) less than about films from any other era.

Sgt. Pepper was once a favorite album, along with, as MichiganJ mentioned, Surrealistic Pillow. In the last year, I heard Donovan's Sunshine Superman and Mellow Yellow albums for the first time in decades. Some of the songs and musical arrangements seemed remarkably fresh--the sitar and tabla in "Guinevere," the guitar in "House of Jansch," for instance. The clothes and hairstyles, not so much. Donovan had a reverse Sgt. Pepper with A Gift From a Flower to a Garden, with all that peace and love and sweetness drowning his talent. The darkness of "Hampstead Incident" was the way to go.

User avatar
ChiO
Posts: 3924
Joined: January 2nd, 2008, 1:26 pm
Location: Chicago

Re: The Beatles

Postby ChiO » January 5th, 2012, 5:47 pm

Some of The Beatles' music may diminish over time, but this
interview is timeless.

[youtube]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PkFSdfDm6bA[/youtube]
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

User avatar
charliechaplinfan
Posts: 9087
Joined: January 15th, 2008, 9:49 am

Re: The Beatles

Postby charliechaplinfan » January 7th, 2012, 10:09 am

I came to the Beatles albums relatively late and had heard much of the reputation of Sargeant Pepper but I think it's harder to appreciate how groundbreaking it was when other artists upped their games in the light of it. It's a great album, not one of my absolute favourites, I like to listen to the songs individually, the kids love When I'm 64. I prefer Abbey Road as a album and also Revolver. Bob Dyaln's Bring it Back Home is up there too.
Failure is unimportant. It takes courage to make a fool of yourself - Charlie Chaplin

RedRiver
Posts: 4209
Joined: July 28th, 2011, 9:42 am

Re: The Beatles

Postby RedRiver » January 7th, 2012, 3:00 pm

ABBEY ROAD is my favorite.


Return to “General Chat”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests