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kingrat
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Re: LISTS

Postby kingrat » March 27th, 2014, 2:58 pm

Masha, you remind me how much I need to watch Casque d'Or and The Flavor of Green Tea Over Rice. I'm also a great admirer of Umberto D., Ikiru, The Life of Oharu, Le Plaisir, Five Fingers, and The Bad and the Beautiful, not to mention the great Edith Evans, who was born to play Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being Earnest.

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CineMaven
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Re: LISTS

Postby CineMaven » March 27th, 2014, 9:49 pm

Vienna wrote:Cinemaven, I love your staccato,to the point,wonderfully descriptive phraseology. Am I being pedantic? No one could call you that! Your words for When Worlds Collide are a classic.
More,please.

Thanxx Vienna. More will come.

* * * * * * * * * *
RedRiver wrote:I don't know ANNE OF THE INDIES. As a Jacques Tourneur fan, I should! Or as my brother says, "Jack Turner. We're not in ****ing France!"

LOL! Tell your brother I said, "Le Big Mac." :lol:
"You build my gallows high, baby."

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ChiO
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Re: LISTS

Postby ChiO » March 28th, 2014, 5:54 am

Quite different list-making experience than for 1951. Very few movies demanded to be in the Top 10, and if non-English language films were mixed in, they'd hold seven of the positions.

1952

1. OTHELLO (Orson Welles) - Each time I see it, I like it Moor.

2. THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT (Alexander Mackendrick) - Sly, witty and pointed. Obviously warming up for his next movie.

3. KANSAS CITY CONFIDENTIAL (Phil Karlson) - Violence, moral outrage, redemption. Karlson.

4. CHICAGO CALLING! (John Reinhardt) - A Duryea tour de force.

5. ANGEL FACE (Otto Preminger) - Not the way to drive down a hill.

6. THE LUSTY MEN (Nicholas Ray) - Ray. Just another Domestic Melodrama.

7. CLASH BY NIGHT (Fritz Lang) - One of those movies that generates the silly "But is it Noir?" argument. Stanwyck. Ryan. Lang. Noir.

8. THE NARROW MARGIN (Richard Fleischer) - All it takes is a train ride to change, or take, a life.

9. MONKEY BUSINESS (Howard Hawks) - I keep asking myself why I like this silly late-Screwball Comedy and I keep getting the same answer: it's a silly late-Screwball Comedy.

10. THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL (Vincente Minnelli) - My favorite movie about Hollywood not directed by anyone named Aldrich.

The seven non-English language films that would be on a combined list:

IKIRU (Akira Kurosawa)
EUROPA '51 (Roberto Rossellini)
THE LIFE OF OHARU (Kenji Mizoguchi)
UMBERTO D (Vittorio de Sica)
LE PLAISIR (Max Ophuls)
CASQUE D'OR (Jacques Becker)
THE GOLDEN COACH (Jean Renoir)
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

kingrat
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Re: LISTS

Postby kingrat » March 28th, 2014, 11:22 am

Good grief, I had Angel Face on the 1953 list, so 1952 must be re-jiggered. The Golden Coach and the Welles Othello are on my need-to-see list.

RedRiver
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Re: LISTS

Postby RedRiver » March 28th, 2014, 12:35 pm

THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT

I guess grey flannel was taken!

kingrat
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Re: LISTS

Postby kingrat » March 28th, 2014, 12:59 pm

I have three special favorites from 1952. Singin’ in the Rain is one of the most joyous films ever made, whereas the two foreign films, Forbidden Games and Umberto D., have among the most emotionally devastating endings committed to celluloid. Ikiru and The Life of Oharu also have places of honor among the foreign films, Le Plaisir is a pleasure, and Fellini’s early comedy The White Sheik provides a little comic relief.

Hollywood favorites run the gamut of genres, although you know it’s the fifties when three of my top twelve are westerns. To refine this list at a later date, I need to re-watch Five Fingers and Phone Call from a Stranger, seen a long time ago, and sometime I need to man up and watch The Quiet Man from beginning to end. Stage Irish charm is not my thing.

Top Ten for 1952:

1. SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN – As some have pointed out, this musical actually has a plot that makes sense. So many joyous moments. A credible Paradiso is even harder to make than a credible Purgatorio or Inferno.
2. THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL – Vincente Minnelli’s best non-musical film, gorgeously directed. Lana Turner’s best dramatic performance. Excellent cast, good script. Did I mention Minnelli’s direction, and the cinematography and sets?
3. HIGH NOON – Might be a position higher if not for Dimitri Tiomkin’s overscoring. The images and dialogue are strong enough to speak for themselves. Carl Foreman has imagined so many kinds of reasons people give for not supporting the sheriff. The previous sheriff, for instance, who fought the good fight in the past and thinks it’s someone else’s turn. The bartender who liked the Miller brothers better than the sheriff; they were much more enjoyable companions. So many recognizable human reactions.
4. VIVA ZAPATA! – One of Elia Kazan’s best films, with shout-outs to John Steinbeck’s superb screenplay and Joseph MacDonald’s cinematography. Steinbeck and Kazan understand the politics of revolution all too well. Joseph Wiseman is chilling as the man who loves Humanity in the abstract, and will kill any number of human beings to prove it. That Brando guy is pretty good, too.
5. THE LONG MEMORY – English audiences of the time didn’t want to see that nice John Mills play a man bent on revenge against those who unjustly put him in prison for twelve years. We may have a different opinion. First-rate British noir, with location shooting in the Kentish marshes. Robert Hamer, who also directed Kind Hearts and Coronets and It Always Rains on Sunday, has been much neglected. Perhaps the “long memory” can correct that.
6. THE BIG SKY – My favorite among Howard Hawks’ dramas. Major bromance between Kirk Douglas and Dewey Martin; this is as close as the fifties can get to Brokeback Mountain. As usual, Hawks draws back from the full emotional potential of his material (Red River is the major exception), but the romantic glow of his ballad-like approach is also appealing.
7. THE LUSTY MEN – Susan Hayward and Arthur Kennedy are somewhat miscast in this rodeo film, too old for the characters they play, and Hayward suggests Brooklyn rather than an itinerant farm worker, but they act well, as does Robert Mitchum in the lead role, and Mitchum and Hayward have good chemistry together. Nicholas Ray provides plenty of atmosphere, beginning with the early scene where Mitchum visits his old home. One of my favorite Nicholas Ray films.
8. ANGEL FACE – Jean Simmons looks so sweet she couldn’t possibly be a femme fatale. Or could she? Robert Mitchum has great chemistry with her, too. Herbert Marshall and Barbara O’Neil are effectively cast as the father Jean loves and the rich stepmother she, um, doesn’t.
9. THE NARROW MARGIN – A classic film noir, brief, exciting, with Marie Windsor showing the kind of attitude we love in noir dames.
10. FIVE FINGERS – I haven’t seen this movie in years, but remember liking this ironic tale of a German spy (James Mason) very much. This tenth spot might well have gone to BEND OF THE RIVER, another of Anthony Mann’s fine westerns, although the climactic James Stewart-as-Rambo scene is a bit much.
10A. “The Last Leaf” from O. HENRY’S FULL HOUSE – I’m not sure whether to include one-fifth of a film in the top ten. Five directors each interpret an O. Henry story, and the results are variable, with Howard Hawks turning in a surprisingly poor version of “The Ransom of Red Chief.” Jean Negulesco’s “The Last Leaf” is another matter. Negulesco uses expressionist lighting and camera set-ups for this tale of a young woman (Anne Baxter) who wants to die because she’s been abandoned by the man she had an affair with. Fortunately, she has a determined sister (Jean Peters), and the painter upstairs (Gregory Ratoff) turns out to be more of a friend than she ever imagined. What could have been sentimental is deeply moving. Peters and Ratoff were never better. One of Negulesco’s best, and a kind of swan song, for Cinemascope won’t suit him nearly so well.


Honorable mention: Bend of the River; The Marrying Kind; Come Back, Little Sheba; My Cousin Rachel; The Man in the White Suit; Kansas City Confidential; The Importance of Being Earnest; Phone Call from a Stranger

Best Actor: Gene Kelly, Singin’ in the Rain
Best Actress: Shirley Booth, Come Back, Little Sheba
Best Supporting Actor: David Wayne, “The Cop and the Anthem” from O. Henry’s Full House or Donald O’Connor (Singin’ in the Rain) or Joseph Wiseman (Viva Zapata!)
Best Supporting Actress: Jean Peters, “The Last Leaf” from O. Henry’s Full House or one of these amazing dames: Edith Evans (The Importance of Being Earnest) or Marie Windsor (The Narrow Margin)

RedRiver
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Re: LISTS

Postby RedRiver » March 28th, 2014, 1:15 pm

Steven Spielberg aptly called THE BAD AND THE BEAUTIFUL, "The best movie about movies." Want melodrama? Look no farther!

I'm glad to see mention of COME BACK, LITTLE SHEBA; a sensitive filming of a downright heartbreaking play. Both the lead players are simply tremendous.

Tell your brother I said, "Le Big Mac."

He'd probably see that as a liberal agenda. Or a French agenda. Or a hamburger agenda. Who knows?

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ChiO
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Re: LISTS

Postby ChiO » March 28th, 2014, 1:49 pm

Good grief, I had Angel Face on the 1953 list, so 1952 must be re-jiggered.

One of those tough ones - released Dec. 11, 1952. Half the time I feel like moving any movie released in December to the following year.
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles

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CineMaven
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Re: LISTS

Postby CineMaven » March 31st, 2014, 7:48 am

1952

I came into existence in this year; and probably stopped my parents' movie-going for a while. Here are my favorites for this year as thin a year as it is for me:

ANGEL FACE - Otto Preminger

Image
Jean Simmons & Robert Mitchum

Boy Meets Girl. A very disturbed girl. I like how this plays out. Jean Simmons is the disturbed girl with a serious Electra Complex. And Robert Mitchum is, well...he's the man who once again, gets led down the garden path by his...by a woman. I’d say Brian DePalma took this movie’s last shot, and used it in his last shot of “Sisters.” Jean Simmons is beautiful...and has edge.

* * * * * * * * * *

THE BAD & THE BEAUTIFUL - Vincente Minnelli

Image
Kirk Douglas & Lana Turner

There was “What Price Hollywood” and “A Star Is Born” but my favorite Hollwyood on Hollywood movie is this one. It’s big, splashy and melodramatic. It’s Kirk like you love to hate him. It's Lana as blonde as blonde can be. And Hollywood? Well, it’s as backstabbing and phony and cut-throat and glamorous as you imagine it to be. What more can you want from Peyton Place-West?

* * * * * * * * * *

HIGH NOON - Fred Zinnemann

Image
Gary Cooper

A deceptively simple Western. Bad guys previously sent to the hoosegow are back in town for revenge. But the sheriff that sent them up the river is now ready to start a new life with his new bride. Somebody’s got to face those guys but the town’s too scared to do so. So Coop decides to face them alone. AND in real time. No frills, no Monument Valley. Just One...Lone..Man.

* * * * * * * * * *

THE MARRYING KIND - George Cukor

Image
Aldo Ray & Judy Holliday

This movie just totally won me over. It wasn’t what I expected and I don’t even know what I expected. It’s the 50’s but the movie wasn’t all sugar and spice and everything nice. Marriage is more than the wedding day. We see two people joining their lives together and the roller coaster ride that it is. Aldo Ray and Judy Holliday were perfectly matched. And Cukor...an old pro does a story with a cutting edge.

* * * * * * * * * *

THE NARROW MARGIN - Richard Fleischer

Image
Charles McGraw

Taut, suspenseful, sparse, twists. What a train ride. I was in it all the way. Yes, I'd want Charles McGraw to protect me especially when he's on the right side of the law. The fight scene on the train rivals the fight in "From Russia With Love." But 'Rosa Klebb' is no Marie Windsor.
Last edited by CineMaven on March 31st, 2014, 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Rita Hayworth
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Re: LISTS

Postby Rita Hayworth » March 31st, 2014, 10:31 am

I like Narrow Margin - CineMaven too!

RedRiver
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Re: LISTS

Postby RedRiver » March 31st, 2014, 3:18 pm

ANGEL FACE - Otto Preminger

You do like 'em dark!

A deceptively simple Western

I love that! Most of my favorite movies are less than complicated. Focus!

THE NARROW MARGIN - Richard Fleischer

Again, less is more. The ultimate low budget crime film.

The fight scene on the train rivals the fight in "From Russia With Love."

NOTHING rivals the fight in FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE!

'Rosa Klebb' is no Marie Windsor.

"She's had her kicks."

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CineMaven
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Re: LISTS

Postby CineMaven » April 1st, 2014, 12:39 am

ANGEL FACE - Otto Preminger
RedRiver wrote:You do like 'em dark!

Brother, I live there.

* * * * *

A deceptively simple Western
I love that! Most of my favorite movies are less than complicated. Focus!

Focus. Sit up straight. And don't call me Shirley.

* * * * *

THE NARROW MARGIN - Richard Fleischer
Again, less is more. The ultimate low budget crime film.

Yes, it's so straight-forward. And it works!

* * * * *

The fight scene on the train rivals the fight in "From Russia With Love."
NOTHING rivals the fight in FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE!

Would I lie to you?

* * * * *

'Rosa Klebb' is no Marie Windsor.
"She's had her kicks."

D'0H! You stole a mouthful, Bub. :lol:
"You build my gallows high, baby."

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Vienna
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Re: LISTS

Postby Vienna » April 1st, 2014, 2:24 am

Cinemaven, my favorite this time is on High Noon - NO FRILLS, NO MONUMENT VALLEY..
Love it.

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ChiO
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Re: LISTS

Postby ChiO » April 2nd, 2014, 10:59 am

I agree with you, Masha. Plenty of wonderful movies, especially in the genre, B-movie and non-English language categories.

1953

1. DUCK DODGERS IN THE 24-1/2 CENTURY (Chuck Jones) - My favorite piece of animation ever, starring my favorite animated character ever. And now this planet is hereby claimed for the Earth in the name of DUCK DODGERS IN THE 24 1/2TH CENTURY! Yea!

2. PICKUP ON SOUTH STREET (Samuel Fuller) - Fuller at his finest. Widmark at his toughest. Ritter at her most incredible. I have to go on making a living so I can die.

3. THE NAKED SPUR (Anthony Mann) - My favorite Western from my favorite director of Westerns. Stewart, Ryan & Meeker. Choosin' a way to die, what's the difference? Choosin' a way to live - that's the hard part.

4. THE HITCH-HIKER (Ida Lupino) - A threesome in the desert. And one has his eye on the other two. I had a watch like this once when I was 17. Nobody gave it to me. I just took it.

5. 99 RIVER STREET (Phil Karlson) - When you're desperate, artifice is real. There are worse things than murder. You can kill someone an inch at a time.

6. THE BIG HEAT (Fritz Lang) - Asking for a cup of coffee has never been the same. And revenge is never as sweet as expected. Hey, I like this. Early nothing!

7. THE BAND WAGON (Vincente Minnelli) - Is this the beginning of the end of the Arthur Freed-MGM-(giant)Musical? I will go "Dancing in the Dark" with Fred & Cyd, thanks to Michael Kidd, anytime. We're not fighting! We're in complete agreement! We hate each other!

8. THE LITTLE FUGITIVE (Ray Ashley/Morris Engel/Ruth Orkin) - The American link between Italian Neo-Realism and the French New Wave. Coney Island, anyone?

9. GLEN OR GLENDA (Edward D. Wood, Jr.) - The start of an auteur's film career. With the finest cast he was ever able to assemble. Only the infinity of the depths of a man's mind can really tell the story.

10. GENTLEMEN PREFER BLONDES (Howard Hawks) - Dazzling - the colors, the music, the wit. Oh, and Jane Russell and Marilyn Monroe. I can be smart when it's important.

What an incredible year for non-English language films. My favorites: TOKYO STORY (Ozu), UGETSU MONOGATARI (Mizoguchi), THE EARRINGS OF MADAME DE... (Ophuls), WAGES OF FEAR (Clouzot), GATE OF HELL (Kinugasa), M. HULOT'S HOLIDAY (Tati), I VITELLONI (Fellini), and EL BRUTO (Bunuel).

A couple of other noteworthy items:

There were at least two TV drama presentations that were outstanding - Marty (Delbert Mann), a presentation of the Philco Television Playhouse with a teleplay by Paddy Chayefsky and starring Rod Steiger; and, King Lear (Andrew McCullough), a presentation on Omnibus with a teleplay by Peter Brook and starring Orson Welles.

A Chicago studio, Filmack Studios, and animator Dave Fleischer teamed to make one of the most beloved and enduring films for my generation: "Let's Go Out to the Lobby". Ummmm...just typing it brings the smell of popcorn!
Everyday people...that's what's wrong with the world. -- Morgan Morgan
I love movies. But don't get me wrong. I hate Hollywood. -- Orson Welles
Movies can only go forward in spite of the motion picture industry. -- Orson Welles


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