SPOILERS!

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Dargo
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Next clue: The film's premise is similar to a certain Twilight Zone episode that starred Inger Stevens
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Swithin
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Carnival of Souls
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Dargo
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Swithin wrote: February 1st, 2024, 8:56 pm Carnival of Souls
Yep, that's it, Swithin! Good job.

And here being the aforementioned director of and ghoulish figure in this cult classic, Herk Harvey...

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Btw and FWIW, every time I see him in his movie here, for some reason he always reminds me of The Amazing Criswell, who is perhaps best remembered for his whole foretelling the future shtick on early Los Angeles television's 'Criswell Predicts' and in Ed Wood's 'Plan Nine from Outer Space'.

(...ball's in your court now, ol' buddy)
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Swithin
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Re: SPOILERS!

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Dargo wrote: February 2nd, 2024, 12:32 am
Swithin wrote: February 1st, 2024, 8:56 pm Carnival of Souls
Btw and FWIW, every time I see him in his movie here, for some reason he always reminds me of The Amazing Criswell, who is perhaps best remembered for his whole foretelling the future shtick on early Los Angeles television's 'Criswell Predicts' and in Ed Wood's 'Plan Nine from Outer Space'.
Thanks Dargo. Criswell also has the distinction of opening Ed Wood's Night of the Ghouls.

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Back later today with another one!
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Swithin
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Re: SPOILERS!

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Two people are making love outdoors. The end credits roll, accompanied by a song from the Victorian Era.
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Swithin
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Swithin wrote: February 2nd, 2024, 3:38 pm Two people are making love outdoors. The end credits roll, accompanied by a song from the Victorian Era.
Today's clues: The film caused a commotion at a European film festival when it played there. Someone was hurt. When it opened in NY, it received some excellent, some negative reviews. It was nominated for one Oscar.
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Swithin
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Re: SPOILERS!

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skimpole wrote: February 3rd, 2024, 7:32 pm The Go-Between?
No, but the film I'm going for is also based on a novel. (I've never seen The Go-Between, though I did see a very good musical version of it a few years ago, starring Michael Crawford.)

Our film has a few songs in it, though it's certainly not a musical. One of the songs (which will an audio clue tomorrow, if no one guesses before then) is pretty important and is mentioned several times in the novel and the film. Another, not quite so important, has these lyrics.

"Life presents a dual picture
Filled with misery and gloom;
Father’s got an anal stricture
Mother’s got a fallen womb;
Cousin Caspar’s been transported for a homosexual crime;
And my sister has aborted for the 42nd time.
Uncle Charlie’s been castrated, and he very rarely smiles;
Mine’s a dismal occupation, crushing ice for grandpa’s piles."
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Swithin
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Swithin wrote: February 3rd, 2024, 8:28 pm
skimpole wrote: February 3rd, 2024, 7:32 pm The Go-Between?
No, but the film I'm going for is also based on a novel. (I've never seen The Go-Between, though I did see a very good musical version of it a few years ago, starring Michael Crawford.)

Our film has a few songs in it, though it's certainly not a musical. One of the songs (which will an audio clue tomorrow, if no one guesses before then) is pretty important and is mentioned several times in the novel and the film. Another, not quite so important, has these lyrics.

"Life presents a dual picture
Filled with misery and gloom;
Father’s got an anal stricture
Mother’s got a fallen womb;
Cousin Caspar’s been transported for a homosexual crime;
And my sister has aborted for the 42nd time.
Uncle Charlie’s been castrated, and he very rarely smiles;
Mine’s a dismal occupation, crushing ice for grandpa’s piles."
Just to enhance the clue of those lyrics, it's sung by a medical student.
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Swithin
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Re: SPOILERS!

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Today's clues: The film is possibly the first -- certainly one of the first -- mainstream movies to use the "F" word.

Yet despite the profanity, it's an oddly beautiful film which also includes this song, which is mentioned several times and played over the end credits:

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Swithin
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skimpole wrote: February 4th, 2024, 2:52 pm The Wikipedia page for the song lists a whole host of movies. But the only movies from the sixties and seventies it lists are The Intelligence Men and The Wind and the Lion and this doesn't sound like either film.
Read the Wikipedia entry for the song again. It may not mention that the song was used in the movie, but it will definitely help you.

Also you can search films that first used the "F" word.

I was sure the mere mention of the song would alert the literati to the film!

As a further clue, I would add that Tom Paxton wrote a song about the female character.
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Swithin
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Re: SPOILERS!

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skimpole wrote: February 4th, 2024, 3:14 pmUlysses?
Yes, it is Joseph Strick's 1967 film of James Joyce's novel. When it was shown at Cannes, Strick was pushed down the stairs when he went up to the projection booth to protest the cuts to the film. The film was better received in America and appeared on the 1967 ten best lists of Bosley Crowther (New York Times) and Roger Ebert, although it did not fare so well with other critics. The film was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay (Fred Haines and Joseph Strick). I'm very fond of the film.

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Ulysses
is the first mainstream (not underground or independent) film to use the 'F" word, before Mash (1970) and I'll Never Forget What's His Name?, which was released later in 1967. The word was spoken by Molly Bloom.

Ulysses starred Milo O'Shea and Barbara Jefford as Leopold and Molly Bloom. I worked with Milo a few times and got to know him pretty well. Lovely man. He and his wife Kitty lived on West 72nd Street on the Upper West Side, across from the Dakota.

The lyrics I first quoted were sung in the film by T.P. McKenna as Buck Mulligan. Maurice Roeves played Stephen Dedalus.

Here's Tom Paxton's song "Molly Bloom."



Your thread Skimpole!
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