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Best War Pictures

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby SSO Admins » March 14th, 2010, 6:39 am

I was lucky enough to see "All Quiet on the Western Front" at the Smithsonian on a big screen with an audience. People walked out looking stunned.

klondike

Re: Best War Pictures

Postby klondike » March 14th, 2010, 10:19 am

Would Michael Mann's The Last of the Mohicans qualify as a war movie?
It does take place during the worst outbreak of the French & Indian War, and accurately depicts same, with about half the scenes revolving around battles, sieges & pursuits. :idea:

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby ChiO » March 14th, 2010, 5:36 pm

Would Michael Mann's The Last of the Mohicans qualify as a war movie?


It would in my book.

The more important question, however, is when did Bluto start wearing a kilt?
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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby klondike » March 14th, 2010, 6:40 pm

ChiO wrote:The more important question, however, is when did Bluto start wearing a kilt?


Amazingly enough, you psychic fellow, Bluto will forever be wearing a kilt, just as soon as I get my next tattoo!
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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby movieman1957 » June 26th, 2010, 11:02 pm

Anyone catch "Men In War" with Robert Ryan?
Chris

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby Lzcutter » June 26th, 2010, 11:08 pm

They Were Expendable immediately comes to mind.

Last of the Mohicans, thanks Klon for that one!

The Story of GI Joe

Hell is for Heroes with a cast that included Steve McQueen, Bob Newhart, Bobby Darin, Fess Parker and James Coburn

Mr Roberts

The Longest Day
Lynn in Lake Balboa

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby Uncle Stevie » June 27th, 2010, 8:21 am

Having lived through the 2nd World War, Korean War, Vietnam War, and all the desert Wars I have been swayed by media and marketing to accept and believe or not believe what I see. The 2nd World War was folly to us young kids. "Let's go see John Wayne or Walter Pigeon command the troops and kill the enemy. As kids we had little emotion. As we got older and were drafted the war became a frightening reality. Fear was in our eyes and raising our hands to pledge our lives for God and our Country was a hard thing to do. We were very young and the reality of life was hard to comprehend.

And so I wonder how you all feel about watching "War Movies"? when younger I loved them. Now I can no longer watch them. The productions are too violent and perhaps too realistic. I hate to see people die and certainly am squeamish about torture. I no longer know who to root for. Do I just watch the images for the Hollywood creation or should I identify the visual with Newspaper Headlines? Who should die and is it right for the movies to make me cry out pity or sorrow, or shame or exasperation? Why should I expose myself to such violence and realism so that I am depressed after it is over. One feature of older movies is they were all a bit hokey in that you left the theater with a small or large feeling of dis-belief. That no longer is true. We believe what we see because we are supposed to. Actors are not included in my feelings because they are all wonderful and perform as they should.

To me the best War movie I saw was Forest Gump because it was a movie of hope and not despair. I dislike frustration run amuck as so many violent movies demonstrate.

I am conflicted about all this. Please help me out and tell me if I am just silly or is this a real happening in my life.

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby Mr. Arkadin » June 27th, 2010, 10:29 am

Uncle Stevie wrote:And so I wonder how you all feel about watching "War Movies"? when younger I loved them. Now I can no longer watch them. The productions are too violent and perhaps too realistic. I hate to see people die and certainly am squeamish about torture. I no longer know who to root for. Do I just watch the images for the Hollywood creation or should I identify the visual with Newspaper Headlines? Who should die and is it right for the movies to make me cry out pity or sorrow, or shame or exasperation? Why should I expose myself to such violence and realism so that I am depressed after it is over.


While I understand your position, I think it really depends upon why you watch movies. I have several friends who have been through devastating circumstances and to see something similar on the screen would upset them greatly. Movies are escapism and entertainment to all of us in some degree, but as in all art, there are works that are designed to make us think and reason, and a good war film often performs this function quite well.

When I see All Quiet on the Western Front (1930) I see the pointlessness of war. Watching Shoah (1984) or Uprising (2001) both of which deal with genocide, I realize that there are principals that must be fought for. In a film like The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), I understand the personal sacrifice that my elders made for me. Triumph of the Will (1933) is a blueprint of how nations can be deceived through clever use of propaganda. Grave of the Fireflies (1988) and Forbidden Games (1953) show the heavy toll of war on civilians--especially children.

These are but a few of the reasons I find these films interesting. I've never thought a war film was something to make me laugh (unless we're talking about satires like Duck Soup [1933] or Dr. Strangelove [1964] which are clever anti-war films), but rather to contemplate the frictions of our times.

War is a factor of life that has touched all our lives. Some have been honorable and just, others have not, but I think that many of these pictures have something to teach us if we're willing to watch and listen.

Here's another recent post with some of my thoughts:

viewtopic.php?p=66954#p66954

jdb1

Re: Best War Pictures

Postby jdb1 » June 27th, 2010, 6:40 pm

Also bear in mind that not all "war" movies are really about war, per se. These movies are about heroism, cowardice, fear, practical and emotional bonding, sense of community, national pride, etc. Stories about these things could be placed in other settings as well, but the war/conflict setting serves to intensify the audience's sense of immediacy and connection with the actors and the action.

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby mrsl » June 27th, 2010, 8:11 pm

.
In most cases I want some sort of female finger in the pie so to speak, but not necessary in war movies, but as I made up my list, I find women appearing prominently in my choices. I like psychological movies, and ones that take in the general beliefs of groups of people.

(*) The Enemy Below: Tough psychological battle between a German submarine Captain, and an American battleship commander.

(*) Cry Havoc: Several women nurses dealing with life immediately behind the front lines.

(*) Stalag 17: POW's dealing with everday problems of being POW's and the added problem of knowing there is a traitor among them reporting everything they say.

(*) Three Came Home: Women in an enemy camp who didn't get out in time and their experiences during their capture based on a true story.

(*) To Hell and Back: Not that great of a movie, but based on a true life hero, where they didn't have to make up events to show his courage.

(*) Best Years of Our Lives: How various families and soldiers deal with return home.

(*) Since You Went Away: How a family deals with basic living during the war, while the main breadwinner is away.

I'm sure my choices are very different from most men, but movies like Battleground, The Story of G.I. Joe are all so very similar, except to remember the actors, it's hard to tell one apart from another. Don't get me wrong, I love those movies like Take the High Ground and others. One thing I find myself doing all the time when I'm watching a war movie is to see if it was written by Frank 'Spig' Wead, from The Wings of Eagles.
Anne


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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby Uncle Stevie » June 28th, 2010, 2:27 am

I agree with Anne about needing a Female. Most movies made included a female somewhere as though all writers/directors felt it was a catalyst to grabbing the viewing public. They need Women's money now and always did. I am not a Feamale but I did see almost all of Anne's movies. I too am in love with women in movies and usually will not enjoy it if Women are absent from the film. You may call me a romantic because I am. I think women make films what they are. Even the non war "My Cousin Vinny" went nowhere without Marissa Tomei.

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby Rita Hayworth » February 10th, 2011, 9:24 pm

My all time favorite is

Patton - 1970

It will take me awhile to generate a list of movies - like everyone here did ... but, George C. Scott portrayal of the legendary and larger than life World War Two General was magnificent. Karl Malden did a wonderful supporting role of General Omar Bradley and I thought played that part exceedingly well.

I often watch Patton at least 2-3 times a year - because its characteristically showed what kind of General he really is. Scott literally nailed the part well; and I was very disappointed to learned later in life that did not accept it for reasons that I heard conflicting reports and I wished not to elaborate any further. He was the best actor bar none that year.

The photography, the pace of the movie, the way the German Army respected him, the two slapping incidents, the problems dealing with politics, and dramatic action scenes made PATTON a great movie.

I simply love it.

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Re: Best War Pictures

Postby stuart.uk » February 19th, 2011, 7:20 am

All Quiet On The Western Front
The Dambusters
Carve Her Name With Pride
Paths Of Glory
The General
To Hell And Back
The Cruel Sea
Pork Chop Hill
Dunkirk
In Which We Serve
Pimpernel Smith
Anzacs
Ice Cold In Alex
Reach For The Sky
Edge Of Darkeness


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